Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Wars on editing Wikipedia articles, uncovered

Date:
February 28, 2013
Source:
Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)
Summary:
An international study, has developed a mathematical model that describes the dynamics of editing conflicts over Wikipedia articles. The results represent a step towards the understanding of mechanisms of collective opinion formation.

An international study, in which the Spanish National Research Council has participated, has developed a mathematical model that describes the dynamics of editing conflicts over Wikipedia articles. The results, published in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters, represent a step towards the understanding of mechanisms of collective opinion formation.

CSIC researcher Maxi San Miguel, director of the Institute for Cross-Disciplinary Physics and Complex Systems (IFISC), a joint research Institute of CSIC and the University of the Balearic Islands, explains: "We say there is a conflict when there is an unusual high number of editing and corrections in articles related to some topic or personage on which there are very divergent or polarised opinions. Our model identifies the different types of behaviours according to two main parameters: the reposition rate of editors as time goes by; and the level of tolerance, that is, how different your opinion must be on the written article so that you decide to take part."

The study describes the generic behaviours observed on a statistical analysis of a large number of articles. Representative examples of those behaviours are observed in articles about the Dresden bombing, Japan and anarchism. Detailed analysis of these three inputs reveals how editors interact and influence each other both directly (through the discussion page of the article) and indirectly (through alternative interactions in the text).

Types of behaviours

The simplest type of behaviour is one in which there are a clash of opinions and a large number of editing, but agreement is reached in a relatively short time. Another typical behaviour is that in which three groups of editors interact: one with a fixed number of individuals that form one "mainstream" and two opposing more "extremist" groups. In this case, consensus is only reached after a long time and the result may not correspond to the initial mainstream view. In the case of a dynamic scenario, where new editors are gradually replacing those who started the conflict, researchers found alternating periods of conflict and consensus, depending on the rate of newcomers and the degree of controversy in the article's topic, indefinitely repeated over time.

CSIC researcher concludes: "Despite all, the model shows that even the most opposing opinions finally converge over time, even without direct interaction between dissenting contributors. The article itself takes part in this process since it brings the opinions of individuals together and helps the convergence process."

 


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Spanish National Research Council (CSIC). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. János Török, Gerardo Ińiguez, Taha Yasseri, Maxi San Miguel, Kimmo Kaski, János Kertész. Opinions, Conflicts, and Consensus: Modeling Social Dynamics in a Collaborative Environment. Physical Review Letters, 2013; 110 (8) DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.088701

Cite This Page:

Spanish National Research Council (CSIC). "Wars on editing Wikipedia articles, uncovered." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 February 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130228113434.htm>.
Spanish National Research Council (CSIC). (2013, February 28). Wars on editing Wikipedia articles, uncovered. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130228113434.htm
Spanish National Research Council (CSIC). "Wars on editing Wikipedia articles, uncovered." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130228113434.htm (accessed April 20, 2014).

Share This



More Computers & Math News

Sunday, April 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Nintendo Changed Gaming World, but Its Future Uncertain: Upstone

Nintendo Changed Gaming World, but Its Future Uncertain: Upstone

AFP (Apr. 19, 2014) — The Nintendo Game Boy celebrates its 25th anniversary Monday and game expert Stephen Upstone says the console can be credited with creating a trend towards handheld gaming devices. Duration: 01:21 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Did Nike Fire Most Of Its Nike FuelBand Team?

Why Did Nike Fire Most Of Its Nike FuelBand Team?

Newsy (Apr. 19, 2014) — Nike fired most of its Digital Sport hardware team, the group behind Nike's FuelBand device. Could Apple or an overcrowded market be behind layoffs? Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Nearly Two Weeks On, The Internet Copes With Heartbleed

Nearly Two Weeks On, The Internet Copes With Heartbleed

Newsy (Apr. 19, 2014) — The Internet is taking important steps in patching the vulnerabilities Heartbleed highlighted, but those preventive measures carry their own costs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Facebook To Share Nearby Friends Data With Advertisers

Facebook To Share Nearby Friends Data With Advertisers

Newsy (Apr. 19, 2014) — A Facebook spokesperson has confirmed the company will use GPS data from the new Nearby Friends feature for advertising sometime in the future. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins