Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Unintended consequences of emergency department information systems in U.S.

Date:
June 24, 2013
Source:
American College of Emergency Physicians
Summary:
Emergency department information systems (EDIS), a significant focus of both federal legislation and US health care reform, may ultimately improve the quality of medical care delivered in hospitals, but as currently configured present numerous threats to health care quality and patient safety.

Emergency department information systems (EDIS), a significant focus of both federal legislation and U.S. health care reform, may ultimately improve the quality of medical care delivered in hospitals, but as currently configured present numerous threats to health care quality and patient safety. Two physician work groups in the American College of Emergency Physicians assessed the potential harm lurking in EDIS and make recommendations on how to improve patient safety as these systems are implemented across the country.

Their findings were published online Friday in Annals of Emergency Medicine ("Quality and Safety Implications of Emergency Department Information Systems").

"The rush to capitalize on the huge federal investment of $30 billion for the adoption of electronic medical records led to some unfortunate and unintended consequences, particularly in the unique emergency department environment," said lead author Heather L. Farley, MD, of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Christiana Care Health System in Newark, Del. "Some relate to product design, others to user behavior. We offer seven recommendations on how to improve the safety of emergency department information systems, and through their use, patient care."

Researchers created clinical scenarios related to four common pitfalls of EDIS use in emergency departments: communication failure, poor data display, wrong order/wrong patient errors and alert fatigue.

They then developed seven recommendations for emergency departments using any type of EDIS, with some recommendations directed at the EDIS vendor and others directed at the end user. These include:

  • appointment of an emergency department "clinician champion,"
  • creation of a multidisciplinary EDIS performance improvement group,
  • establishment of an ongoing review process,
  • timely attention to EDIS-related patient safety concerns raised by the review process,
  • public dissemination of lessons learned from performance improvement efforts,
  • timely distribution by EDIS vendors of product updates to all users, and
  • removal of "hold harmless" and "learned intermediary" clauses from all vendor software contracts.

"The recommendations developed by our work groups should be paired with those issued by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 2011 in its report 'Health IT and Patient Safety: Building Safer Systems for Better Care,'" said Dr. Farley. "The irreversible drive toward EDIS implementation should be accompanied by a constant focus on improvement and hazard prevention. Our paper and the IOM paper create a framework for doing just that."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American College of Emergency Physicians. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American College of Emergency Physicians. "Unintended consequences of emergency department information systems in U.S.." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 June 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130624133147.htm>.
American College of Emergency Physicians. (2013, June 24). Unintended consequences of emergency department information systems in U.S.. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130624133147.htm
American College of Emergency Physicians. "Unintended consequences of emergency department information systems in U.S.." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130624133147.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Generics Eat Into Pfizer's Sales

Generics Eat Into Pfizer's Sales

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 29, 2014) Pfizer, the world's largest drug maker, cut full-year revenue forecasts because generics could cut into sales of its anti-arthritis drug, Celebrex. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Nigeria Ups Ebola Stakes on 1st Death

Nigeria Ups Ebola Stakes on 1st Death

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 29, 2014) Nigerian authorities have shut and quarantined a Lagos hospital where a Liberian man died of the Ebola virus, the first recorded case of the highly-infectious disease in Africa's most populous economy. David Pollard reports Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Running 5 Minutes A Day Might Add Years To Your Life

Running 5 Minutes A Day Might Add Years To Your Life

Newsy (July 29, 2014) According to a new study, just five minutes of running or jogging a day could add years to your life. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Outbreak Poses Little Threat To U.S.: CDC

Ebola Outbreak Poses Little Threat To U.S.: CDC

Newsy (July 29, 2014) The Ebola outbreak in West Africa poses little threat to Americans, according to officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins