Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Social media guidelines force physician identity crisis

Date:
August 14, 2013
Source:
Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics
Summary:
Ethics and psychiatry experts say current guidelines for physician conduct on social media are misframing the issue as a distinction between personal and professional identities, forcing physicians into an online "identity crisis".

From the small-town doctor to the Freud -- Ferenczi debate over sharing personal anecdotes, controversy over physicians' professional identity is nothing new. The question of physician conduct on social media is simply a new context for an old debate, but ethics and psychiatry experts at Johns Hopkins say current guidelines are misframing the issue of physician professionalism online, missing the opportunity to shed new light on the evergreen issue of physicians' role in society.

In a JAMA Viewpoint opinion published August 14, the experts say that current guidelines, including the recently released by American College of Physicians and Federation of State Medical Boards, are asking the wrong question about medical professionalism online; it's not a question of whether content is professional or personal, but whether it is appropriate of a physician in public.

"Resolving the online identity crisis requires recognizing that social media exist in primarily public or potentially public spaces, not exclusively professional or exclusively personal ones," write authors Matthew DeCamp, MD, PhD, Thomas Koenig, MD, and Margaret Chisolm, MD.

The authors assert that it is "operationally impossible" and therefore "nonsensical" to separate personal and professional identities, as many guidelines suggest. They will underscore their point by participating in a live Twitter chat scheduled for 2:00 PM on Friday, August 16, with the hashtag #IDcrisis, hosted by the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics (@bermaninstitute).

"Professional identity is a component of personal identity, much as a person can identify both as a colleague and parent in different contexts," says Chisolm, a professor in the department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.

"The internet is a reimagined small-town square for the digital age, where a comment made casually to a friend can suddenly spread like wildfire," says DeCamp, a practicing general internist at Hopkins and faculty member at the Berman Institute. "Social media presents an opportunity for physicians to connect with their community, and they can maintain an appropriate professional identity while doing so by keeping in mind they are speaking in a public forum. So rather than something completely novel, social media is simply a new forum for professional conduct in public, which physicians negotiate all the time," DeCamp says.

The authors warn that attempts to adhere to existing guidelines and "depersonalize" their identity online may backfire, reducing trust of physicians who are attempting to hide something, and increasing patient stress in response to a physician perceived to be impersonal and unsympathetic.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Matthew DeCamp. Social Media and Physicians’ Online Identity CrisisSocial Media and Physicians’ Online Identity CrisisViewpoint. JAMA, 2013; 310 (6): 581 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2013.8238

Cite This Page:

Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics. "Social media guidelines force physician identity crisis." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 August 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130814124212.htm>.
Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics. (2013, August 14). Social media guidelines force physician identity crisis. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130814124212.htm
Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics. "Social media guidelines force physician identity crisis." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130814124212.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

AP (July 22, 2014) Two federal appeals courts issued conflicting rulings Tuesday on the legality of the federally-run healthcare exchange that operates in 36 states. (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The new sci-fi thriller "Lucy" is making people question whether we really use all our brainpower. But, as scientists have insisted for years, we do. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Newsy (July 22, 2014) Boston scientists have discovered a new way to create fully functioning human platelets using a bioreactor and human stem cells. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

TheStreet (July 21, 2014) New research shows Gilead Science's drug Sovaldi helps in curing hepatitis C in those who suffer from HIV. In a medical study, the combination of Gilead's Hep C drug with anti-viral drug Ribavirin cured 76% of HIV-positive patients suffering from the most common hepatitis C strain. Hepatitis C and related complications have been a top cause of death in HIV-positive patients. Typical medication used to treat the disease, including interferon proteins, tended to react badly with HIV drugs. However, Sovaldi's %1,000-a-pill price tag could limit the number of patients able to access the treatment. TheStreet's Keris Lahiff reports from New York. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins