Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Adults with mental illness have lower rate of decline in smoking

Date:
January 7, 2014
Source:
The JAMA Network Journals
Summary:
In recent years, the decline in smoking among individuals with mental illness was significantly less than among those without mental illness, although the rates of quitting smoking were greater among those receiving mental health treatment, according to a study.

In recent years, the decline in smoking among individuals with mental illness was significantly less than among those without mental illness, although the rates of quitting smoking were greater among those receiving mental health treatment, according to a study in the January 8 issue of JAMA.

"Despite significant progress made in reducing tobacco use within the general population, individuals with mental illness smoke at rates approximately twice that of adults without mental disorders and comprise more than half of nicotine-dependent smokers," according to background information in the article. Mental illness is associated with higher levels of nicotine dependence, intensity of smoking, and smoking severity (i.e., number of cigarettes/week). Tobacco cessation efforts have focused on the general population rather than individuals with mental illness.

Benjamin Lę Cook, Ph.D., M.P.H., of the Harvard Medical School/Cambridge Health Alliance, Cambridge, Mass., and colleagues used nationally representative surveys of U.S. residents to compare trends in smoking rates between adults with and without mental illness and across multiple disorders (2004-2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey [MEPS]) and compared rates of smoking cessation among adults with mental illness who did and did not receive mental health treatment (2009-2011 National Survey of Drug Use and Health [NSDUH]).The MEPS sample included 32,156 respondents with mental illness (reporting severe psychological distress, probable depression, or receiving treatment for mental illness) and 133,113 without mental illness. The NSDUH sample included 14,057 lifetime smokers with mental illness.

The researchers found that adjusted smoking rates declined significantly from 2004 to 2011 among individuals without mental illness, decreasing from 19.2 percent to 16.5 percent, but did not change significantly among those with mental illness, decreasing only from 25.3 percent to 24.9 percent. "… the fact that smoking rates for individuals receiving mental health care have not experienced the same rates of decline as the general population suggests limited adoption of integrated treatments and ongoing barriers to cessation treatment in mental health care settings."

The rate of quitting smoking among individuals who received mental health treatment was 37.2 percent, significantly higher than the 33.1 percent quit rate among those who did not receive mental health treatment. Receiving any mental health treatment significantly increased the probability of having quit.

"These results suggest that smokers can quit and remain abstinent from cigarettes during mental health treatment and that this is a promising setting to promote smoking cessation. It also indicates the importance of assisting smokers with mental illness in overcoming barriers to accessing mental health care (e.g., insuring the uninsured, increasing the supply of mental health care professionals, improving linkages between primary care and mental health care) as a means to address smoking-related harm," the authors write.

"The mechanisms that support persistently higher rates of smoking among individuals with mental illness are complex and remain understudied. Patients with mental illness may attribute greater benefits and reward value to smoking compared with patients without psychiatric disorders or may experience more difficult life circumstances, higher negative affect, or a relative lack of alternative rewards. Identifying new interventions to address mechanisms specific to this population should be a priority for tobacco control policy."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The JAMA Network Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Benjamin Lę Cook, Geoff Ferris Wayne, E. Nilay Kafali, Zimin Liu, Chang Shu, Michael Flores. Trends in Smoking Among Adults With Mental Illness and Association Between Mental Health Treatment and Smoking Cessation. JAMA, 2014; 311 (2): 172 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2013.284985

Cite This Page:

The JAMA Network Journals. "Adults with mental illness have lower rate of decline in smoking." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 January 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140107170739.htm>.
The JAMA Network Journals. (2014, January 7). Adults with mental illness have lower rate of decline in smoking. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140107170739.htm
The JAMA Network Journals. "Adults with mental illness have lower rate of decline in smoking." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140107170739.htm (accessed April 24, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Study Says Most Crime Not Linked To Mental Illness

Study Says Most Crime Not Linked To Mental Illness

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) — A new study finds most crimes committed by people with mental illness are not caused by symptoms of their illness or disorder. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Smaller Plates And Cutlery Could Make You Feel Fuller

How Smaller Plates And Cutlery Could Make You Feel Fuller

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) — NBC's "Today" conducted an experiment to see if changing the size of plates and utensils affects the amount individuals eat. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Do We Get Nicer With Age?

Do We Get Nicer With Age?

Newsy (Apr. 22, 2014) — A recent report claims personality can change over time as we age, and usually that means becoming nicer and more emotionally stable. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
How to Master Motherhood With the Best Work/Life Balance

How to Master Motherhood With the Best Work/Life Balance

TheStreet (Apr. 22, 2014) — In the U.S., there are more than 11 million couples trying to conceive at any given time. From helping celebrity moms like Bethanny Frankel to ordinary soon-to-be-moms, TV personality and parenting expert, Rosie Pope, gives you the inside scoop on mastering motherhood. London-born entrepreneur Pope is the creative force behind Rosie Pope Maternity and MomPrep. She explains why being an entrepreneur offers the best life balance for her and tips for all types of moms. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins