Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Cochrane Review of malaria medication

Date:
January 21, 2014
Source:
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
Summary:
Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine is more effective than artemether-lumefantrine as a malaria medication, and has fewer side effects than artesunate-mefloquine' concludes a systematic review published.

'Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine is more effective than artemether-lumefantrine, and has fewer side effects than artesunate-mefloquine' concludes a systematic review published by the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group, hosted by LSTM.

Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine is one of five artemisinin-based combination therapies currently recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO), and this review finds that it is also one of the most studied. The team of authors from South Africa, Kenya, Geneva and Liverpool included 27 randomized studies, enrolling 16,382 adults and children, which directly compared the relative efficacy and safety of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine and the widely used alternatives; artemether-lumefantrine, artesunate plus mefloquine, and artesunate plus amodiaquine.

"The very long duration of action of piperaquine in this combination, means that DHA-P reduces the risk of the person suffering another bout of malaria for up to nine weeks after treatment," explained David Sinclair from LSTM. "This gives it an advantage over most of the other combinations. Mefloquine has a similarly long duration of action but commonly causes side-effects such as nausea, vomiting and dizziness."

Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine also became one of the few antimalarials to be formally registered by a stringent regulatory authority when the European Medicines Agency approved it for use in 2013. The registration process highlighted concerns that dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine caused some short term changes in electrocardiographs tracing the conduction of the heart rhythm. The review also examined this effect, and the authors report that the number of people affected by these changes is small and all resolved spontaneously without serious consequences.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Babalwa Zani, Michael Gathu, Sarah Donegan, Piero L Olliaro, David Sinclair. Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine for treating uncomplicatedPlasmodium falciparummalaria. Cocharane Review, January 2014 DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD010927

Cite This Page:

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. "Cochrane Review of malaria medication." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 January 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140121143854.htm>.
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. (2014, January 21). Cochrane Review of malaria medication. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140121143854.htm
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. "Cochrane Review of malaria medication." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140121143854.htm (accessed August 28, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Mini Pacemaker Has No Wires

Mini Pacemaker Has No Wires

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) Cardiac experts are testing a new experimental device designed to eliminate major surgery and still keep the heart on track. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
After Cancer: Rebuilding Breasts With Fat

After Cancer: Rebuilding Breasts With Fat

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) More than 269 million women are diagnosed with breast cancer each year. Many of them will need surgery and radiation, but there’s a new simple way to reconstruct tissue using a patient’s own fat. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Blood Clots in Kids

Blood Clots in Kids

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) Every year, up to 200,000 Americans die from a blood clot that travels to their lungs. You’ve heard about clots in adults, but new research shows kids can get them too. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Radio Waves Knock out Knee Pain

Radio Waves Knock out Knee Pain

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) Doctors have used radio frequency ablation or RFA to reduce neck and back pain for years. But now, that same technique is providing longer-term relief for patients with severe knee pain. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins