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Scientific first allows doctors to 'see' radiation treatment in body

Date:
January 22, 2014
Source:
Norris Cotton Cancer CenterDartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center
Summary:
A scientific breakthrough may give the field of radiation oncology new tools to increase the precision and safety of radiation treatment in cancer patients by helping doctors “see” the powerful beams of a linear accelerator as they enter or exit the body.

A scientific breakthrough may give the field of radiation oncology new tools to increase the precision and safety of radiation treatment in cancer patients by helping doctors "see" the powerful beams of a linear accelerator as they enter or exit the body.

Dartmouth began to investigate a scientific phenomenon called the Cherenkov effect in 2011. Our scientists and engineers theorized that by using Cherenkov emissions the beam of radiation could be "visible" to the treatment team. The ability to capture a beam of radiation would show:

• how the radiation signals travel through the body

• the dose of radiation to the skin

• any errors in dosage.

For the first time in humans, researchers have used the technology with patients. The first case was a female breast cancer patient undergoing radiation.

"Breast cancer is suited for this because the imaging visualizes the superficial dose of radiation to the skin," said Lesley A. Jarvis, MD, radiation oncologist, Norris Cotton Cancer Center. Skin reactions, similar to sunburn, are a common and bothersome side effect during breast radiation. "By imaging and quantitating the surface dose in a way that has never been done before," said Jarvis, "we hope to learn more about the physical factors contributing to this skin reaction."

By seeing the effect of radiation on the body, Norris Cotton Cancer Center radiation oncologists and physicists can make adjustments to avoid side effects to the skin. Most radiation patients undergo somewhere between 8-20 sessions. The Cherenkov images of the breast cancer patient showed a hot spot in her underarm, which physicians and physicists could work to prevent in future sessions.

"The actual images show that we are treating the exact correct location, with the appropriate beam modifications and with the precise dose of radiation," said Jarvis.

This trial showed that the Cherenkov effect is feasible for use real-time during radiation. "We have learned the imaging is easy to incorporate into the patient's treatment, adding only minimal time to the treatments," said Jarvis.

"The time needed to acquire this information is negligible, even with our experimental, non-integrated system," said Gladstone. By integrating Cherenkov imaging into routine clinical care, Gladstone says the technology could be used to verify that the proper dose is being delivered to patients, helping to avoid misadministration of radiation therapy, a rare, but dangerous occurrence.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Norris Cotton Cancer CenterDartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Norris Cotton Cancer CenterDartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. "Scientific first allows doctors to 'see' radiation treatment in body." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 January 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140122133428.htm>.
Norris Cotton Cancer CenterDartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. (2014, January 22). Scientific first allows doctors to 'see' radiation treatment in body. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140122133428.htm
Norris Cotton Cancer CenterDartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. "Scientific first allows doctors to 'see' radiation treatment in body." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140122133428.htm (accessed September 1, 2014).

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