Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Child savings accounts promote positive social-emotional development, study finds

Date:
January 29, 2014
Source:
Washington University in St. Louis
Summary:
A college savings account in a child’s name not only gives parents hope for the future, it also results in improved social-emotional health for their children, research demonstrates.

A college savings account in a child's name not only gives parents hope for the future, it also results in improved social-emotional health for their children.

Related Articles


That's the result of a new study released Jan. 27 online in JAMA Pediatrics.

The study, led by Washington University in St. Louis' Center for Social Development (CSD) in collaboration with the state of Oklahoma, began in 2007 as SEED for Oklahoma Kids (SEED OK), an innovative policy experiment to invest in children at birth. The program automatically opened and deposited $1,000 in an Oklahoma college savings plan account for 1,360 newborns.

Results show a pattern in which scores from the treatment group (those with the automatically opened SEED OK account) indicate better development than those from the control group (those with no SEED OK account). Researchers liken these effects to outcomes associated with Head Start early-childhood programs, which have been shown to improve social-emotional development for 3-year-olds.

"The theory behind SEED OK is that accumulating assets within a household may positively affect the family's outlook on that child's future," said Michael Sherraden, PhD, the Benjamin E. Youngdahl Professor of Social Development and director of the CSD. "Now, seven years later, we're beginning to see this work yielding promising results."

Sherraden is a pioneer in the field of Child Development Accounts and in 2010 was named one of Time magazine's "TIME 100" most influential people.

The primary findings reported in JAMA Pediatrics find that positive effects occur regardless of whether parents have deposited money into an account themselves, indicating that neither the act of saving nor the amount saved is relevant in this developmental improvement.

"It appears to be the account and holding assets that matter," Sherraden said, "even if a mother does not have her own money to contribute at the moment."

Parents reported social-emotional development when their children were approximately 4 years old, based on questions in three areas: self-regulation, compliance and interaction with people. CSD researchers find that positive social-emotional development is even more pronounced among disadvantaged groups, including those who have low education, earn low income, receive welfare benefits or rent their home.

At this early stage in the experiment, it is difficult to gauge the full impact of SEED OK on these children, and researchers cannot assume long-term effects of college savings accounts. SEED OK will continue to follow the children and study the impact as the children progress through their school years and beyond.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Washington University in St. Louis. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jin Huang, Michael Sherraden, Youngmi Kim, Margaret Clancy. Effects of Child Development Accounts on Early Social-Emotional Development. JAMA Pediatrics, 2014; DOI: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.4643

Cite This Page:

Washington University in St. Louis. "Child savings accounts promote positive social-emotional development, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 January 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140129114618.htm>.
Washington University in St. Louis. (2014, January 29). Child savings accounts promote positive social-emotional development, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140129114618.htm
Washington University in St. Louis. "Child savings accounts promote positive social-emotional development, study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140129114618.htm (accessed October 30, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Studying Effects of Music on Dementia Patients

Studying Effects of Music on Dementia Patients

AP (Oct. 30, 2014) The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee is studying the popular Music and Memory program to see if music, which helps improve the mood of Alzheimer's patients, can also reduce the use of prescription drugs for those suffering from dementia. (Oct. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Techy Tots Are Forefront of London's Baby Show

Techy Tots Are Forefront of London's Baby Show

AP (Oct. 28, 2014) Moms and Dads get a more hands-on approach to parenting with tech-centric products for raising their little ones. (Oct. 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Cocoa Could Be As Good For Memory As It Is For A Sweet Tooth

Cocoa Could Be As Good For Memory As It Is For A Sweet Tooth

Newsy (Oct. 27, 2014) Researchers have come up with another reason why dark chocolate is good for your health. A substance in the treat can reportedly help with memory. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Five-Year-Olds Learn Coding as Britain Eyes Digital Future

Five-Year-Olds Learn Coding as Britain Eyes Digital Future

AFP (Oct. 27, 2014) Coding has become compulsory for children as young as five in schools across the UK. Making it the first major world economy to overhaul its IT teaching and put programming at its core. Duration: 02:19 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins