Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Marker may predict response to ipilimumab in advanced melanoma

Date:
February 4, 2014
Source:
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)
Summary:
Among patients with advanced melanoma, presence of higher levels of the protein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in blood was associated with poor response to treatment with the immunotherapy ipilimumab, according to a study published.

Among patients with advanced melanoma, presence of higher levels of the protein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in blood was associated with poor response to treatment with the immunotherapy ipilimumab, according to a study published in Cancer Immunology Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Related Articles


The study suggests combining immunotherapy with VEGF inhibitors, also known as angiogenesis inhibitors, may be a potential option for these patients.

The immune-checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab works by boosting the body's immune system to combat melanoma. VEGF is a protein that promotes new blood vessel formation and growth, a process called angiogenesis, thus providing nutrients to the growing tumor. The study found that among patients who had late-stage melanoma, those who had high levels of VEGF in their blood prior to treatment with ipilimumab had decreased clinical benefit, poor overall survival outcomes, and were 60 percent more likely to die of their disease, compared with those who had lower levels of VEGF.

"VEGF is known to suppress the maturation of immune cells and their antitumor responses, and evidence points toward an association between high serum VEGF levels and poor prognosis in melanoma patients," said F. Stephen Hodi, M.D., director of the Melanoma Center at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Mass. "VEGF has also been shown to be a potential biomarker for other immunotherapies, thus it seemed logical to test the ability of VEGF to predict responses to ipilimumab.

"We found that VEGF may actually hinder some of the effects of the immune-checkpoint inhibitor," Hodi added. "We are beginning to better define predictive biomarkers for immune-checkpoint blockers, specifically ipilimumab. Our study further suggests that there is a potential interaction existing between the biology of angiogenesis and immune-checkpoint blockade."

Hodi and colleagues conducted retrospective analyses of blood samples collected from 176 patients with metastatic melanoma, before and after they were treated with ipilimumab, at Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Patients were 16 to 91 years old, and the majority of them had stage 4 disease.

VEGF levels in patients' blood ranged from 0.1 to 894.4 picograms per milliliter (pg/ml). The investigators determined 43 pg/ml to be the cutoff value, and evaluated patient responses to treatment as those whose pretreatment VEGF levels were greater than (VEGF-high) or less than (VEGF-low) the cutoff value.

They found that at 24 weeks after starting ipilimumab treatment, 41 percent of the VEGF-low patients experienced clinical benefit, including partial or complete treatment responses; only 23 percent of the VEGF-high patients experienced a clinical benefit.

The median overall survival for VEGF-low patients was 12.9 months, compared with 6.6 months for VEGF-high patients.

The researchers found that while pretreatment VEGF levels had the potential to predict treatment outcomes, changes in VEGF levels during treatment were not linked to treatment outcomes.

"It may be worthwhile to investigate combining immune-checkpoint inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors in advanced melanoma with high serum VEGF levels," said Hodi. His team has initiated a randomized clinical trial to test ipilimumab in combination with bevacizumab, an angiogenesis inhibitor, in patients with advanced melanoma.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. J. Yuan, J. Zhou, Z. Dong, S. Tandon, D. Kuk, K. S. Panageas, P. Wong, X. Wu, J. Naidoo, D. B. Page, J. D. Wolchok, F. S. Hodi. Pretreatment Serum VEGF Is Associated with Clinical Response and Overall Survival in Advanced Melanoma Patients Treated with Ipilimumab. Cancer Immunology Research, 2014; 2 (2): 127 DOI: 10.1158/2326-6066.CIR-13-0163

Cite This Page:

American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). "Marker may predict response to ipilimumab in advanced melanoma." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140204073704.htm>.
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). (2014, February 4). Marker may predict response to ipilimumab in advanced melanoma. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140204073704.htm
American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). "Marker may predict response to ipilimumab in advanced melanoma." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140204073704.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) Need another reason to eat yogurt every day? Researchers now say it could reduce a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins