Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Death in the digital age: What happens to our status updates and selfies after we've gone?

Date:
February 4, 2014
Source:
Lancaster University
Summary:
Researchers are analyzing the ways in which western mourning practices are changing in the modern world thanks to the increasing amounts of personal data we leave online.

Researchers Dr Paul Coulton and Selina Ellis Gray are analysing the ways in which western mourning practices are changing in the modern world thanks to the increasing amounts of personal data we leave online.

Selina Ellis Gray said: "Our deaths are now followed by the slow decay of a massive body of data, which include huge amounts created from regular social media use."

As part of her interdisciplinary PhD, she is questioning what happens to all our tweets, status updates and selfies after we've gone and how can we begin to design for these remains.

Until the social media boom the popular understanding was the public mourning was in retreat in the west, with social and religious traditions no longer having such a uniform influence on the way we say goodbye. But in today's Facebook age a new form of mourning has emerged. Selina Ellis Gray's ongoing research explores blogs about grief, memorial pages on Facebook, tributes on Instagram, shrines on twitter, digital scrapbooks and support groups for the bereaved springing up in diverse and highly personal responses to loss. Decades of similar digital content is also decaying, posing new problems to those that are left behind to manage it.

Dr Coulton said: "In today's digital age, when we die we often leave behind a digital legacy. Relatives are no longer only considering what to do with books, tea sets, vases and toolboxes but they are also thinking about online social remnants such as digital photos, videos, status updates and emails.

"While these ghostly reminders online are enabling new types of mourning practices, they are consequently presenting a number of challenges to the traditional role of custodianship as these remnants of digital life cannot be placed within rooms or on shelves in quite the same way as a piece of jewellery or a lock of hair.

"These remains are searchable, discoverable and open to reinterpretation such that the dead can return unbidden to haunt the living in unexpected ways."

The threshold between life and death has also become a much more public event with the last status updates and final tweets of victims of events such as the Colorado massacre becoming global news. Selina has documented how such spaces online have become highly visited, with some gathering over 10 million views and daily visitors who consider these places as a positive focus for their loss. She hopes her ongoing research in this emergent area will have an impact on future technology design and also support services. Alongside her thesis, Selina has a number of publications forthcoming in 2014 and will be presenting at this year's first 'Death Online Research' symposium with other leading experts in the field.

Dr Coulton said: "These changing responses to death -- and the digital legacy we leave behind -- are posing all sorts of new questions and challenges, not only for technology designers and professionals who provide bereavement support but also for society in general."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Lancaster University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Lancaster University. "Death in the digital age: What happens to our status updates and selfies after we've gone?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140204074033.htm>.
Lancaster University. (2014, February 4). Death in the digital age: What happens to our status updates and selfies after we've gone?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140204074033.htm
Lancaster University. "Death in the digital age: What happens to our status updates and selfies after we've gone?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140204074033.htm (accessed August 1, 2014).

Share This




More Computers & Math News

Friday, August 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Google (Kind Of) Complies With 'Right To Be Forgotten Law'

Google (Kind Of) Complies With 'Right To Be Forgotten Law'

Newsy (July 31, 2014) Google says it is following Europe's new "Right To Be Forgotten Law," which eliminates user information upon request, but only to a certain degree. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Tesla, Panasonic Ink Deal To Make Huge Battery 'Gigafactory'

Tesla, Panasonic Ink Deal To Make Huge Battery 'Gigafactory'

Newsy (July 31, 2014) The deal will help build a massive battery factory that Tesla says will produce 500,000 lithium batteries by 2020. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sprint's Custom Prepaid Plans Draw Net Neutrality Fire

Sprint's Custom Prepaid Plans Draw Net Neutrality Fire

Newsy (July 31, 2014) Sprint's Virgin Mobile Custom plan offers optional social network access that doesn't count against data caps — but critics are crying foul. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Britain Testing Driverless Cars on Roadways

Britain Testing Driverless Cars on Roadways

AP (July 30, 2014) British officials said on Wednesday that driverless cars will be tested on roads in as many as three cities in a trial program set to begin in January. Officials said the tests will last up to three years. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins