Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Educational interventions at Early Head Start led to decline in pediatric emergency visits

Date:
April 7, 2014
Source:
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health
Summary:
Integrating an educational intervention regarding upper respiratory infections into Early Head Start programs led to a significant decrease in pediatric emergency visits and adverse care practices among predominantly Latino families, who have been shown to be at high risk for limited health literacy.

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center found that integrating an educational intervention regarding upper respiratory infections (URI) into Early Head Start programs led to a significant decrease in pediatric emergency visits and adverse care practices among predominantly Latino families, who have been shown to be at high risk for limited health literacy. Findings are published in the journal Pediatrics.

Four Early Head Start sites in New York City in the Washington Heights/Inwood section of Northern Manhattan were randomly assigned to intervention or standard curriculum. At two of the sites, families received three 1.5-hour education modules regarding care for URI in their parent-child group in the fall and at the remaining two they received the standard educational parent health curriculum; the standard curriculum sites received the URI education in the spring after the study period. The intervention education modules included information on care for URI, the appropriate use of over-the-counter medications and medication measurement training. Classes were taught by trained bilingual community health workers and conducted in either English or Spanish. Parents were also given and taught how to use an upper respiratory infection care kit.

During weekly telephone calls over the course of five months, the 154 families, who were primarily Latino and Spanish speaking, and included 197 children under the age of four, were asked to report URIs in their households, the symptoms, those who were affected, care sought, and the medications given to all family members. Outcomes were compared between intervention and standard curriculum groups.

Among the intervention families, 8.2% reported visiting the pediatric emergency department when their young child, ages 6 to less than 48 months, was ill, compared to nearly double (15.7%) receiving the standard curriculum. The families in the intervention module were also less likely to ever use during the reporting period an inappropriate over-the-counter medication for their under two- year old (12.2% vs. 32.4%) and/or incorrect over-the-counter medicine dosing tool for their under four-year old (9.8% vs. 31.1%). There was no difference between groups in use of non-prescribed antibiotics for a child less than four years of age.

"Our study illustrates the potential strength of using Early Head Start for a health education intervention," said Melissa Stockwell, MD, MPH, assistant professor of Population and Family Health at Columbia's Mailman School of Public Health and Pediatrics at Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons. "While some other educational interventions have been successful in increasing knowledge and care practices for upper respiratory illness, they were conducted predominately in non-minority populations, with higher health literacy levels. Many interventions also took place in primary care offices or pharmacies."

The researchers also point out that while utilizing the pediatric emergency department remains high for non-urgent conditions, on a national scale, even small changes in the number of visits could have an important impact on costs. This intervention also demonstrates the potential for distributing information on important health issues in non-medical settings.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Melissa S. Stockwell, Marina Catallozzi, Elaine Larson, Carmen Rodriguez, Anupama Subramony, Raquel Andres Martinez, Emelin Martinez, Angela Barrett, and Dodi Meyer. Effect of a URI-Related Educational Intervention in Early Head Start on ED Visits. Pediatrics, March 2014 DOI: 10.1542/peds.2013-2350

Cite This Page:

Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. "Educational interventions at Early Head Start led to decline in pediatric emergency visits." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 April 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140407090731.htm>.
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. (2014, April 7). Educational interventions at Early Head Start led to decline in pediatric emergency visits. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140407090731.htm
Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. "Educational interventions at Early Head Start led to decline in pediatric emergency visits." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140407090731.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

AP (July 28, 2014) West African nations and international health organizations are working to contain the largest Ebola outbreak in history. It's one of the deadliest diseases known to man, but the CDC says it's unlikely to spread in the U.S. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

AP (July 28, 2014) A bipartisan deal to improve veterans health care would authorize at least $15 billion in emergency spending to fix a veterans program scandalized by long patient wait times and falsified records. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Reuters - US Online Video (July 28, 2014) Two American aid workers in Liberia test positive for Ebola while working to combat the deadliest outbreak of the virus ever. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

AP (July 28, 2014) Classes are being offered nationwide to encourage African Americans to learn about cooking fresh foods based on traditional African cuisine. The program is trying to combat obesity, heart disease and other ailments often linked to diet. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins