Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Back to basics: Redesigning systems of care for older adults with Alzheimer's disease

Date:
April 8, 2014
Source:
Indiana University
Summary:
Two new dementia care models seek to decrease stress for caregivers, reduce health care costs and improve quality of care for older adults. Among the most significant features of both of these care models are caregivers' close involvement with the medical team and an underlying understanding that decisions should be based on attaining agreed upon goals -- goals that may rule out burdensome treatments for the older adult with dementia.

The number of older adults with dementia in the United States is forecast to more than double over the next 40 years. Caring for these individuals will have a significant impact on caregivers as well as the health care system and its workforce.

In a paper published in the April issue of the peer-reviewed journal Health Affairs, Regenstrief Institute investigator Christopher M. Callahan, M.D., founding director of the Indiana University Center for Aging Research, reviews two new dementia care models that seek to decrease stress for caregivers, reduce health care costs and improve quality of care for older adults.

Among the most significant features of both of these care models, Dr. Callahan said, are caregivers' close involvement with the medical team and an underlying understanding that decisions should be based on attaining agreed upon goals -- goals that may rule out burdensome treatments for the older adult with dementia.

"To date, the development of a cure for Alzheimer's disease remains elusive. We need to devote more resources to providing humane, high-touch, less costly care today and for many years to come for the large number of individuals who are and will be affected," said Dr. Callahan, the Cornelius and Yvonne Pettinga Professor in Aging Research at the IU School of Medicine. "It's time to think about going back to the basics to improve the quality of life for both the patient and the caregivers."

Dr. Callahan is a geriatrician whose own research has focused on depression in older adults and on the care of older adults by primary care physicians. He and co-authors reviewed two care models that offer promise for implementation on a national scale: Optimizing Patient Transfers, Impacting Medical Quality and Improving Symptoms: Transforming Institutional Care, known as OPTIMISTIC; and the Healthy Aging Brain Center. Both care models were developed by Regenstrief and IU clinician-researchers with support from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation and in collaboration with Eskenazi Health.

Features of both care models profiled in the review article -- such as a team-based approach to care; a focus on the caregiver, who may be a family member or a paid health care worker; and the long-term management of symptoms -- are not easily applied within the current structure of primary care. Thus, these new models require a redesign of the health care system and changes in the workforce. And, significantly, the models run counter to financial incentives in the current health care delivery system.

Each model is being implemented on a broad scale, with the goal of demonstrating improved dementia care quality and outcomes, accompanied by cost savings, in both community-based and institutional care settings.

"The larger question, however, is what the United States is willing to pay for this care -- and researchers, health care systems, payers, and the American public all need to address that question," the paper concluded. "Achieving the goals of better outcomes and lower costs will require leadership from academe, industry, government, and advocacy groups to advance the debate about what is the optimal approach to care for older adults with dementia who are nearing the end of life."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Indiana University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. C. M. Callahan, G. A. Sachs, M. A. LaMantia, K. T. Unroe, G. Arling, M. A. Boustani. Redesigning Systems Of Care For Older Adults With Alzheimer's Disease. Health Affairs, 2014; 33 (4): 626 DOI: 10.1377/hlthaff.2013.1260

Cite This Page:

Indiana University. "Back to basics: Redesigning systems of care for older adults with Alzheimer's disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 April 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140408111910.htm>.
Indiana University. (2014, April 8). Back to basics: Redesigning systems of care for older adults with Alzheimer's disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140408111910.htm
Indiana University. "Back to basics: Redesigning systems of care for older adults with Alzheimer's disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140408111910.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) President Obama is expected to send 3,000 troops to West Africa as part of the effort to contain Ebola's spread. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Man Floats for 31 Hours in Gulf Waters

Man Floats for 31 Hours in Gulf Waters

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) A Texas man is lucky to be alive after he and three others floated for more than a day in the Gulf of Mexico when their boat sank during a fishing trip. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ivorians Abandon Monkey Pets in Fear Over Ebola Virus

Ivorians Abandon Monkey Pets in Fear Over Ebola Virus

AFP (Sep. 16, 2014) Since the arrival of Ebola in Ivory Coast, Ivorians have been abandoning their pets, particularly monkeys, in the fear that they may transmit the virus. Duration: 00:47 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Links Male-Pattern Baldness To Prostate Cancer

Study Links Male-Pattern Baldness To Prostate Cancer

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) New findings suggest men with a certain type of baldness at age 45 are 39 percent more likely to develop aggressive prostate cancer. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

      Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins