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Better to be bullied than ignored in the workplace, study finds

Date:
May 29, 2014
Source:
University of British Columbia
Summary:
Being ignored at work is worse for physical and mental well-being than harassment or bullying, says a new study. Researchers found that while most consider ostracism less harmful than bullying, feeling excluded is significantly more likely to lead to job dissatisfaction, quitting and health problems. "We've been taught that ignoring someone is socially preferable -- if you don't have something nice to say, don't say anything at all," says a co-author. "But ostracism actually leads people to feel more helpless, like they're not worthy of any attention at all."

Being ignored at work is worse for physical and mental well-being than harassment or bullying, says a new study from the University of British Columbia's Sauder School of Business.

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Researchers found that while most consider ostracism less harmful than bullying, feeling excluded is significantly more likely to lead to job dissatisfaction, quitting and health problems.

"We've been taught that ignoring someone is socially preferable -- if you don't have something nice to say, don't say anything at all," says Sauder Professor Sandra Robinson, who co-authored the study. "But ostracism actually leads people to feel more helpless, like they're not worthy of any attention at all."

The researchers used a series of surveys for their study. First they determined that people consistently rate workplace ostracism as less socially inappropriate, less psychologically harmful and less likely to be prohibited than workplace harassment.

Additional surveys revealed that people who claimed to have experienced ostracism were significantly more likely to report a degraded sense of workplace belonging and commitment, a stronger intention to quit their job, and a larger proportion of health problems.

The researchers also took an employment survey by a Canadian university that included feedback on feelings of workplace isolation and harassment and compared it to turnover rates three years after the survey was conducted and found that people who reported feeling ostracized were significantly more likely to have quit.

"There is a tremendous effort underway to counter bullying in workplaces and schools, which is definitely important. But abuse is not always obvious," says Robinson. "There are many people who feel quietly victimized in their daily lives, and most of our current strategies for dealing with workplace injustice don't give them a voice."

Background

The study, Is negative attention better than no attention? The comparative effects of ostracism and harassment at work, is forthcoming in the journal Organization Science and was co-authored by Professor Jane O'Reilly, Telfer School of Management, University of Ottawa, Professor Jennifer Berdahl, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto, and Professor Sara Banki, Graduate School of Management and Economics, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of British Columbia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jane O'Reilly, Sandra L. Robinson, Jennifer L. Berdahl, Sara Banki. Is Negative Attention Better Than No Attention? The Comparative Effects of Ostracism and Harassment at Work. Organization Science, 2014; 140404113351000 DOI: 10.1287/orsc.2014.0900

Cite This Page:

University of British Columbia. "Better to be bullied than ignored in the workplace, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 May 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140529100715.htm>.
University of British Columbia. (2014, May 29). Better to be bullied than ignored in the workplace, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140529100715.htm
University of British Columbia. "Better to be bullied than ignored in the workplace, study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140529100715.htm (accessed January 28, 2015).

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