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Tougher penalties credited for fewer casualties among young male drivers

Date:
June 6, 2014
Source:
University of Western Ontario
Summary:
A significant decline in speeding-related fatalities and injuries among young men has been found in Ontario since the province's tough extreme speeding and aggressive driving laws were introduced in 2007. A study found a sustained reduction of about 58 speeding-related injuries and fatalities a month among males aged 16-24. That means about 700 fewer young men have been injured or killed in speeding-related crashes yearly since the law was passed.

A new study out of Western University (London, Canada) has found a significant decline in speeding-related fatalities and injuries among young men in Ontario since the province's tough extreme speeding and aggressive driving laws were introduced in 2007. The study found a sustained reduction of about 58 speeding-related injuries and fatalities a month among males aged 16-24. That means about 700 fewer young men have been injured or killed in speeding-related crashes yearly since the law was passed.

The study led by Evelyn Vingilis, PhD, a professor in Family Medicine, and Epidemiology and Biostatistics at Western's Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, evaluated the deterrent impact of Ontario's Street Racers, Stunt, and Aggressive Drivers Legislation (Bill 203) and found it is making a difference, not only in the number of convictions but also in reducing the number of collisions.

Under the law, drivers caught going 50 kph over the speed limit or engaging in improper actions that constitute a driving stunt, contest, or race can immediately have their licenses suspended and their vehicles impounded for seven days. Upon conviction, they also face a fine of $2,000-$10,000, license suspension for up to two years or six demerit points, and the possibility of up to six months in jail. The penalties get even more severe with a second conviction.

"First of all we looked at males and females, and then we looked at younger and older individuals because we know from my earlier research, that street racing and extreme speeding is an activity that typically younger males are more likely to engage in," said Vingilis. "What we found was a substantial reduction in the number of convictions for extreme speeding for males, and no change for females because they were pretty low any way. And importantly, we found a significant decrease in the number of motor vehicle casualties of males 16 to 24 -quite a significant reduction."

Vingilis says the study's findings support deterrence theory to the effect that certain, swift and severe sanctions can deter risky driving behavior.

The research, conducted in collaboration with the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario (MTO), looked at data from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2011. The law came into effect September 30, 2007, enabling the researchers to compare the data before and after implementation. From the time the new law came into force to the end of 2011, more than 24,000 drivers' licenses were suspended for violating the new street racing legislation, nearly 8,500 of them in the first year alone.

For the 16 to 24 year old male drivers, 1.21% of licensed drivers had their licenses suspended, along with .37 per cent of mature males (aged 25-64). That contrasted with .21 per cent for 16-24 year old female drivers and .07 per cent for 25-64 year old women.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Western Ontario. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Aizhan Meirambayeva, Evelyn Vingilis, A. Ian McLeod, Yoassry Elzohairy, Jinkun Xiao, Guangyong Zou, Yuanhao Lai. Road safety impact of Ontario street racing and stunt driving law. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 2014; 71: 72 DOI: 10.1016/j.aap.2014.05.009
  2. Aizhan Meirambayeva, Evelyn Vingilis, Guangyong Zou, Yoassry Elzohairy, A. Ian McLeod, Jinkun Xiao. Evaluation of Deterrent Impact of Ontario's Street Racing and Stunt Driving Law on Extreme Speeding Convictions. Traffic Injury Prevention, 2014; 140528080958001 DOI: 10.1080/15389588.2014.890721

Cite This Page:

University of Western Ontario. "Tougher penalties credited for fewer casualties among young male drivers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140606131459.htm>.
University of Western Ontario. (2014, June 6). Tougher penalties credited for fewer casualties among young male drivers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140606131459.htm
University of Western Ontario. "Tougher penalties credited for fewer casualties among young male drivers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140606131459.htm (accessed August 22, 2014).

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