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Preserving the Battle of Hastings from 'contamination'

Date:
June 11, 2014
Source:
University of Huddersfield
Summary:
The Battle of Hastings is regularly fought all over again by enthusiastic re-enactors, before large crowds of spectators. The problem is that they are depositing material that could compromise the archaeology of the historic site. But now one of the world's leading battlefield archaeologists is developing a unique project designed to unearth whatever genuine material survives from 1066.

BATTLE OF HASTINGS - The East Sussex 1066 site gets the vote as one of the world's 10 best historical re-enactments. Hastings is described as "the most-remembered armed conflict in British history" and the re-enactments every year now involve thousands of participants and spectators around the world.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Huddersfield

The Battle of Hastings is regularly fought all over again by enthusiastic re-enactors, before large crowds of spectators. The problem is that they are depositing material that could compromise the archaeology of the historic site. But now the University of Huddersfield's Dr Glenn Foard -- one of the world's leading battlefield archaeologists -- is developing a unique project designed to unearth whatever genuine material survives from 1066.

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The first stage, likely to take place in spring 2015, would be to spend a week machining away the top layers of soil at a substantial area of the battlefield, in order to eliminate modern artefacts. Then there would be a search for genuine remains from the battle of 1066.

An important dimension of the project would be public involvement. Trained archaeologists would carry out the actual survey, but there would be parallel sessions nearby, partly aimed at children and parents, which would provide insights into archaeology, including the use of metal detectors to survey a site.

"Now the challenge is on to find out what archaeology is there, before it suffers contamination from all the activities that are going on," says Dr Foard. "Whether there is archaeology under the ground to be confused by the re-enactment activities, we don't know yet."

One of Dr Foard's battlefield coups was to detect the true location of the Battle of Bosworth, where famously Richard III was slain in 1485.

The result of Dr Foard's work found that the actual battle took place more than two miles from the site where it was traditionally thought to have been fought. However, as he collaborates with English Heritage to plan his investigation of Hastings, he is working on the assumption that the Battle of Hastings in 1066 was fought on its traditional site, even though there have been attempts to establish an alternative location.

"I have no reason to believe that any of the alternatives are likely," said Dr Foard. "I will never say that they are impossible -- not after my work on Bosworth -- but all the evidence I saw when I looked at Bosworth suggested that it wasn't fought on the traditional site. At Hastings, however, everything I have looked at tells me that the battle did take place on the generally accepted site.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Huddersfield. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Huddersfield. "Preserving the Battle of Hastings from 'contamination'." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140611102124.htm>.
University of Huddersfield. (2014, June 11). Preserving the Battle of Hastings from 'contamination'. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140611102124.htm
University of Huddersfield. "Preserving the Battle of Hastings from 'contamination'." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140611102124.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

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