Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Energy storage technology: More pores for more power

Date:
June 30, 2014
Source:
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (LMU)
Summary:
When can we expect to drive the length of Germany in an electric car without having to top up the battery? Chemists have now synthesized a new material that could show the way forward to state-of-the-art lithium-sulfur batteries.

When can we expect to drive the length of Germany in an electric car without having to top up the battery? Chemists at the NIM Cluster at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich and at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, have now synthesized a new material that could show the way forward to state-of-the-art lithium-sulfur batteries.

Whether or not the future of automotive traffic belongs to the softly purring electric car depends largely on the development of its batteries. The industry is currently placing most of its hopes in lithium-sulfur batteries, which have a very high storage capacity. Moreover, thanks to the inclusion of sulfur atoms, they are cheaper to make and less toxic than conventional lithium-ion power packs.

However, the lithium-sulfur battery still presents several major challenges that need to be resolved until it can be integrated into cars. For example, both the rate and the number of possible charge-discharge cycles need to be increased before the lithium-sulfur battery can become a realistic alternative to lithium-ion batteries.

Lots of pores for sulfur

The chemists Professor Thomas Bein (LMU), Coordinator of the Energy Conversion Division of the Nanosystems Initiative Munich, Professor Linda Nazar (University of Waterloo, Waterloo Institute of Nanotechology) and their colleagues have now succeeded in producing a novel type of nanofiber, whose highly ordered and porous structure gives it an extraordinarily high surface-to-volume ratio. Thus, a sample of the new material the size of a sugar cube presents a surface area equivalent to that of more than seven tennis courts.

“The high surface-to-volume ratio, and high pore volume is important because it allows sulfur to bind to the electrode in a finely divided manner, with relatively high loading. Together with its easy accessibility, this enhances the efficiency of the electrochemical processes that occur in the course of charge-discharge cycles. And the rates of the key reactions at the sulfur electrode-electrolyte interface, which involve both electrons and ions, are highly dependent on the total surface area available,” as Benjamin Mandlmeier, a postdoc in Bein’s Institute and a first co-author on the new study, explains.

The secret recipe

A novel recipe and a cleverly designed mode of synthesis are the key factors that determine the properties of the new materials. To synthesize the carbon fibers, the chemists first prepare a porous, tubular silica template, starting from commercially available, but non-porous fibers. This template is then filled with a special mixture of carbon, silicon dioxide and surfactants, which is then heated at 900°C. Finally the template and the SiO2 are removed by an etching process. During the procedure, the carbon nanotubes – and thus the pore size – shrink to a lesser extent than they would in the absence of the confining template, and the fibers themselves are correspondingly more stable.

“Nanostructured materials have great potential for the efficient conversion and storage of electrical energy,” says Thomas Bein. “We in the NIM Cluster will continue to collaborate closely with our colleagues in the Bavarian SolTech Network in order to explore and exploit the properties of such structures and their practical applications.”


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (LMU). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Guang He, Benjamin Mandlmeier, Jörg Schuster, Linda F. Nazar, Thomas Bein. Bimodal Mesoporous Carbon Nanofibers with High Porosity: Freestanding and Embedded in Membranes for Lithium–Sulfur Batteries. Chemistry of Materials, 2014; 140618153048006 DOI: 10.1021/cm403740r

Cite This Page:

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (LMU). "Energy storage technology: More pores for more power." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140630124335.htm>.
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (LMU). (2014, June 30). Energy storage technology: More pores for more power. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140630124335.htm
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (LMU). "Energy storage technology: More pores for more power." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140630124335.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Boeing Ups Outlook on 52% Profit Jump

Boeing Ups Outlook on 52% Profit Jump

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 23, 2014) — Commercial aircraft deliveries rose seven percent at Boeing, prompting the aerospace company to boost full-year profit guidance- though quarterly revenues missed analyst estimates. Bobbi Rebell reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Europe's Car Market on the Rebound?

Europe's Car Market on the Rebound?

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 23, 2014) — Daimler kicks off a round of second-quarter earnings results from Europe's top carmakers with a healthy set of numbers - prompting hopes that stronger sales in Europe will counter weakness in emerging markets. Hayley Platt reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
9/11 Commission Members Warn of Terror "fatigue" Among American Public

9/11 Commission Members Warn of Terror "fatigue" Among American Public

Reuters - US Online Video (July 22, 2014) — Ten years after releasing its initial report, members of the 9/11 Commission warn of the "waning sense of urgency" in combating terrorists attacks. Mana Rabiee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Government Approves East Coast Oil Exploration

Government Approves East Coast Oil Exploration

AP (July 18, 2014) — The Obama administration approved the use of sonic cannons to discover deposits under the ocean floor by shooting sound waves 100 times louder than a jet engine through waters shared by endangered whales and turtles. (July 18) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins