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Does your training routine really need to be that complicated?

Date:
August 5, 2014
Source:
Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press)
Summary:
Researchers investigated the value of the Pre-Exhaustion training method and found that that the various arrangements of different exercise protocols is of less relevance than simply performing resistance training exercises with a high intensity of effort within any protocol. PreEx training is based on the principle that the targeted muscles can be pre-exhausted with isolation exercises immediately prior to a compound exercise -- thereby providing greater stimulation to the target muscles.

A new study just published in Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism investigated the value of the Pre-Exhaustion (PreEx) training method and found that that the various arrangements of different exercise protocols is of less relevance than simply performing resistance training exercises with a high intensity of effort within any protocol. As resistance training is becoming a major intervention for health and disease prevention, improved understanding in this area is increasingly important.

PreEx training is based on the principle that the targeted muscles can be pre-exhausted with isolation exercises immediately prior to a compound exercise -- thereby providing greater stimulation to the target muscles. Contrary to popular belief that this major stimulus from resistance training revolves around the high degree of effort at the end of a set of repetitions, this study found that the order of exercises or interval between sets has minimal to no added benefits.

The authors of the study were James Fisher and James Steele of Southampton Solent University and Dave Smith of Manchester University in the UK along with Luke Carlson of Discover Strength, Plymouth, Minnesota.

"This research study represents a real work-out, by real people in a real gym not a laboratory gym as in much strength training research. Our results suggest that exercise order and rest interval make no difference to chronic strength increases following 12 weeks of training, but rather should be chosen based on personal preference," explained James Fisher, lead author.

"In addition, whilst scientific research in trained participants is lacking, maybe as a result of the diminished gains compared to untrained persons, the present study shows that significant strength increases can continue as a result of brief (~23 minutes) and infrequent (2 x / week) resistance exercise when intensity of effort is maximised. This research demonstrates ecological validity as well as scientific rigour; it shows practical results from an approach to resistance exercise that most people can immediately utilise."

"The effects of pre-exhaustion, exercise order and rest intervals in a full body resistance training intervention" was published today in the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. James Peter Fisher, Luke Carlson, James Steele, Dave Smith. The effects of pre-exhaustion, exercise order, and rest intervals in a full-body resistance training intervention. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, 2014; 1 DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2014-0162

Cite This Page:

Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press). "Does your training routine really need to be that complicated?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 August 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140805132144.htm>.
Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press). (2014, August 5). Does your training routine really need to be that complicated?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140805132144.htm
Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press). "Does your training routine really need to be that complicated?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140805132144.htm (accessed September 18, 2014).

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