Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Awake within a dream: Lucid dreamers show greater insight in waking life

Date:
August 12, 2014
Source:
University of Lincoln
Summary:
People who are aware they are asleep when they are dreaming have better than average problem-solving abilities, new research has discovered. Experts say that those who experience ‘lucid dreaming’ -- a phenomenon where someone who is asleep can recognize that they are dreaming -- can solve problems in the waking world better than those who remain unaware of the dream until they wake up.

People who are aware they are asleep when they are dreaming have better than average problem-solving abilities, new research has discovered.
Credit: Piotr Marcinski / Fotolia

People who are aware they are asleep when they are dreaming have better than average problem-solving abilities, new research has discovered.

Related Articles


Experts from the University of Lincoln, UK, say that those who experience 'lucid dreaming' -- a phenomenon where someone who is asleep can recognise that they are dreaming -- can solve problems in the waking world better than those who remain unaware of the dream until they wake up.

The concept of lucid dreaming was explored in the 2010 film Inception, where the dreamers were able to spot incongruities within their dream. It is thought some people are able to do this because of a higher level of insight, meaning their brains detect they are in a dream because events would not make sense otherwise.

This cognitive ability translates to the waking world when it comes to finding the solution to a problem by spotting hidden connections or inconsistencies, researchers say.

The research by Dr Patrick Bourke, Senior Lecturer at the Lincoln School of Psychology, is the first empirical study demonstrating the relationship between lucid dreaming and insight.

He said: "It is believed that for dreamers to become lucid while asleep, they must see past the overwhelming reality of their dream state, and recognise that they are dreaming.

"The same cognitive ability was found to be demonstrated while awake by a person's ability to think in a different way when it comes to solving problems."

The study examined 68 participants aged between 18 and 25 who had experienced different levels of lucid dreaming, from never to several times a month. They were asked to solve 30 problems designed to test insight. Each problem consisted of three words and a solution word.

Each of the three words could be combined with the solution word to create a new compound word. For example with the words 'sand', 'mile' and 'age', the linking word would be 'stone'.

Results showed that frequent lucid dreamers solved 25 per cent more of the insight problems than the non-lucid dreamers.

Dr Bourke was assisted with the study by student Hannah Shaw who has since graduated.

The research, called "Spontaneous Lucid Dreaming and Waking Insight," was published in the American Psychological Association's journal, Dreaming.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Lincoln. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Patrick Bourke, Hannah Shaw. Spontaneous lucid dreaming frequency and waking insight.. Dreaming, 2014; 24 (2): 152 DOI: 10.1037/a0036908

Cite This Page:

University of Lincoln. "Awake within a dream: Lucid dreamers show greater insight in waking life." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 August 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140812121839.htm>.
University of Lincoln. (2014, August 12). Awake within a dream: Lucid dreamers show greater insight in waking life. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140812121839.htm
University of Lincoln. "Awake within a dream: Lucid dreamers show greater insight in waking life." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140812121839.htm (accessed January 29, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Thursday, January 29, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Binge-Watching TV Linked To Loneliness

Binge-Watching TV Linked To Loneliness

Newsy (Jan. 29, 2015) Researchers at University of Texas at Austin found a link between binge-watching TV shows and feelings of loneliness and depression. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Signs You Might Be The Passive Aggressive Friend

Signs You Might Be The Passive Aggressive Friend

BuzzFeed (Jan. 28, 2015) "No, I&apos;m not mad. Why, are you mad?" Video provided by BuzzFeed
Powered by NewsLook.com
City Divided: A Look at Model Schools in the TDSB

City Divided: A Look at Model Schools in the TDSB

The Toronto Star (Jan. 27, 2015) Model schools are rethinking how they engage with the community to help enhance the lives of the students and their parents. Video provided by The Toronto Star
Powered by NewsLook.com
Man Saves Pennies For 65 Years

Man Saves Pennies For 65 Years

Rooftop Comedy (Jan. 26, 2015) A man in Texas saved every penny he found for 65 years, and this week he finally cashed them in. Bank tellers at Prosperity Bank in Slaton, Texas were shocked when Ira Keys arrived at their bank with over 500 pounds of loose pennies stored in coffee cans. After more than an hour of sorting and counting, it turned out the 81 year-old was in possession of 81,600 pennies, or $816. And he&apos;s got more at home! Video provided by Rooftop Comedy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins