Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Sleepy college students stressed by jobs

Date:
August 20, 2014
Source:
University of Alabama
Summary:
College students are typically more sleep deprived than the rest of us and often ignore the health benefits of adequate slumber, said a researcher who studies the topic. "Sleep is extremely important to overall health," one researcher said. "Poor sleep has short-term consequences on mood, concentration, higher learning and can lead to the dangers involved in drowsy driving. "It also has long-term ramifications on our overall health. Research has found links between poor sleep and diabetes, cardiovascular disease and obesity."

College students are typically more sleep deprived than the rest of us and often ignore the health benefits of adequate slumber, said a researcher who studies the topic.

Related Articles


Dr. Adam Knowlden, an assistant professor in The University of Alabama's department of health science, recently surveyed college students about their sleep behaviors and attitudes. He co-authored an article that will publish in a forthcoming issue of Family & Community Health.

"The health benefits of sleep did not factor into students' decisions about whether or not to get adequate sleep," said Knowlden of the students in the study. "This might suggest the students offset sleep when faced with other activities they deem more important, such as academic coursework or social activities."

Students in the study cited job stress and a lack of time as the two greatest factors that prevented them from getting enough sleep.

"About 33 percent of the general population receives insufficient sleep versus about 60 percent of the college population," Knowlden said. "One of the main differences is that college students' ability to get sufficient sleep is more within their control, whereas the general adult population is more likely to be dealing with medical sleep disorders."

In the study, Knowlden and his co-author, Dr. Manoj Sharma, a researcher formerly in the health promotion and education program at the University of Cincinnati, recruited 188 University of Cincinnati college students for the study that began in the spring of 2012.

Students in the study were employed undergraduates who operated motor vehicles and who were not diagnosed with sleep disorders.

Other findings of the study included:

• Students were more concerned about inadequate sleep hindering their abilities to manage stress and concentrate at work than they were its impact on their long-term health.

• Students cited having nighttime environments conducive to sleep, reducing mental and physical stress and maintaining a consistent sleep schedule as factors they believed most important in ensuring sufficient sleep.

Compared to the general population, college students have different factors that can interfere with their sleeping patterns, the UA researcher said.

"Students may be experiencing a new level of independence and can struggle to find the balance between juggling classes, finances, social lives, athletics, volunteer work, parental expectations and employment.

"While most students see sleep in a positive light, most are unaware of practices that can improve their sleep," Knowlden said. "Learning how to manage time and finances, for example, are two key ways to help students reduce stress."

The good news, Knowlden said, is that students' perceptions of the benefits of sleep can be changed.

"Students can achieve good sleep and still maximize their educational opportunities."

Obtaining sufficient sleep -- seven to eight hours a day -- is important for all, Knowlden said.

"Sleep is extremely important to overall health," Knowlden said. "Poor sleep has short-term consequences on mood, concentration, higher learning and can lead to the dangers involved in drowsy driving.

"It also has long-term ramifications on our overall health. Research has found links between poor sleep and diabetes, cardiovascular disease and obesity."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Alabama. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Alabama. "Sleepy college students stressed by jobs." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 August 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140820111719.htm>.
University of Alabama. (2014, August 20). Sleepy college students stressed by jobs. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 21, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140820111719.htm
University of Alabama. "Sleepy college students stressed by jobs." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140820111719.htm (accessed April 21, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Research Says Complex Tools Might Not Be 'Our Thing' Anymore

Research Says Complex Tools Might Not Be 'Our Thing' Anymore

Newsy (Apr. 21, 2015) The use of complex tools has often been seen as a defining characteristic of humanity, but that notion is now in question. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Our Love Of Puppy Dog Eyes Explained By Science

Our Love Of Puppy Dog Eyes Explained By Science

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2015) Researchers found a spike in oxytocin occurs in both humans and dogs when they gaze into each other&apos;s eyes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Find Link Between Gestational Diabetes And Autism

Scientists Find Link Between Gestational Diabetes And Autism

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2015) Researchers who analyzed data from over 300,000 kids and their mothers say they&apos;ve found a link between gestational diabetes and autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Video Messages Help Reassure Dementia Patients

Video Messages Help Reassure Dementia Patients

AP (Apr. 17, 2015) Family members are prerecording messages as part of a unique pilot program at the Hebrew Home in New York. The videos are trying to help victims of Alzheimer&apos;s disease and other forms of dementia break through the morning fog of forgetfulness. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins