Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Social inequalities in salt consumption remain despite drop in salt intake over last 10 years in Britain

Date:
August 26, 2014
Source:
University of Warwick
Summary:
Social inequalities in salt consumption remain despite national drop in salt intake over last 10 years in Britain, a study shows. Researchers looked at the geographical distribution of habitual dietary salt intake in Britain and its association with manual occupations and educational attainments, both indicators of socio-economic position and key determinants of health.

People from low socio-economic positions in Britain still eat more salt than those from higher socio-economic positions, irrespective of where they live.

Related Articles


A paper published in the BMJ Open journal and led by Warwick Medical School suggests social inequalities in salt intake have hardly changed in the period from 2000-01 to 2011. This is despite a national average salt reduction over this time.

This paper is the first to monitor social inequalities following the national salt reduction program. The research was carried out by the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Nutrition, based at Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick.

Researchers looked at the geographical distribution of habitual dietary salt intake in Britain and its association with manual occupations and educational attainments, both indicators of socio-economic position and key determinants of health.

The researchers used the British National Diet and Nutrition Survey (2008-11), a national representative sample of 1,027 men and women aged 19-64 years living in Britain. Salt intake was assessed with a 4-day food diary, assessing salt consumption from food. Salt added by consumers at the table and during cooking (discretionary salt) was not measured.

There was a significant reduction in dietary salt consumption from 2000-1 to 2008-11 of 0.9g of salt per day, consistent with the total reduction in salt consumption of 1.4g per day reported nationally when also discretionary use of salt is taken into account.

Professor Francesco Cappuccio, senior author and Director of the WHO Collaborating Centre, said: "Whilst we are pleased to record an average national reduction in salt consumption coming from food of nearly a gram per day, we are disappointed to find out that the benefits of such a program have not reached those most in need. These results are important as people of low socio-economic background are more likely to develop high blood pressure (hypertension) and to suffer disproportionately from strokes, heart attacks and renal failure."

Professor Cappuccio continued: "The diet of disadvantaged socio-economic groups tends to be made up of low-quality, salt-dense, high-fat, high-calorie unhealthy cheap foods. We have seen a reduction in salt intake in Britain thanks to a policy, which included awareness campaigns, food reformulation and monitoring. However, clearly poorer households still have less healthy shopping baskets and the broad reformulation of foods high in salt has not reached them as much as we would have hoped."

"In our continued effort to reduce population salt intake towards a 6g per day target in Britain, it is crucial to understand the reasons for these social inequalities so as to correct this gap for an equitable and cost-effective delivery of cardiovascular prevention," Professor Cappuccio concluded.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Warwick. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. C. Ji, F. P. Cappuccio. Socioeconomic inequality in salt intake in Britain 10 years after a national salt reduction programme. BMJ Open, 2014; 4 (8): e005683 DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005683

Cite This Page:

University of Warwick. "Social inequalities in salt consumption remain despite drop in salt intake over last 10 years in Britain." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 August 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140826205419.htm>.
University of Warwick. (2014, August 26). Social inequalities in salt consumption remain despite drop in salt intake over last 10 years in Britain. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 18, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140826205419.htm
University of Warwick. "Social inequalities in salt consumption remain despite drop in salt intake over last 10 years in Britain." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140826205419.htm (accessed April 18, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Our Love Of Puppy Dog Eyes Explained By Science

Our Love Of Puppy Dog Eyes Explained By Science

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2015) Researchers found a spike in oxytocin occurs in both humans and dogs when they gaze into each other&apos;s eyes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Find Link Between Gestational Diabetes And Autism

Scientists Find Link Between Gestational Diabetes And Autism

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2015) Researchers who analyzed data from over 300,000 kids and their mothers say they&apos;ve found a link between gestational diabetes and autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Video Messages Help Reassure Dementia Patients

Video Messages Help Reassure Dementia Patients

AP (Apr. 17, 2015) Family members are prerecording messages as part of a unique pilot program at the Hebrew Home in New York. The videos are trying to help victims of Alzheimer&apos;s disease and other forms of dementia break through the morning fog of forgetfulness. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Boy or Girl? Intersex Awareness Is on the Rise

Boy or Girl? Intersex Awareness Is on the Rise

AP (Apr. 17, 2015) At least 1 in 5,000 U.S. babies are born each year with intersex conditions _ ambiguous genitals because of genetic glitches or hormone problems. Secrecy and surgery are common. But some doctors and activists are trying to change things. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins