Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Study Findings May Lead To Earlier Diagnosis And Treatment Of Atherosclerosis

Date:
November 17, 1997
Source:
University Of Pittsburgh Medical Center
Summary:
Earlier diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerosis may be possible using specially engineered, gas-filled microbubbles, according to a study by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

PITTSBURGH, Nov. 11 -- Earlier diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerosis may be possible using specially engineered, gas-filled microbubbles, according to a study by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC).

The study will be presented Nov. 11 by Flordeliza S. Villanueva, M.D., assistant professor of medicine in the division of cardiology, at the annual scientific session of the American Heart Association in Orlando, Fla.

Microbubbles, gas-filled microspheres the size of red blood cells, are used in contrast echocardiography, an ultrasound technique used to detect blood flow to the heart muscle in conditions such as angina or heart attack.

One of the first processes leading to atherosclerosis involves the inflammation of the endothelial cells which line blood vessels. The researchers wanted to find a way to identify these abnormal endothelial cells which are harbingers of atherosclerosis. To simulate the inflammation which occurs on endothelial cells during early atherosclerosis, cultured endothelial cells were experimentally stimulated to produce a protein on their surface called ICAM-1. ICAM-1 is thought to be centrally involved in the development of atherosclerosis.

"Currently, we have no techniques for identifying this potentially reversible, major change in endothelial cells in humans," Dr. Villanueva said.

The study, performed in collaboration with William Wagner, Ph.D., assistant professor of surgery and chemical engineering at the UPMC's McGowan Center for Artificial Organ Development, attempted to develop contrast echocardiography as a method to study this very early abnormality which occurs in patients who subsequently develop coronary artery disease.

In their study, the researchers cultured human coronary artery endothelial cells on lab coverslips. Three types of microbubbles were made; one containing anti-human ICAM-1 monoclonal antibody, one with non-specific murine immunoglobulin, and one with no added proteins.

Some of the endothelial cells were stimulated by interleukin-1 while others were not. Both groups were then exposed to one of the microbubble preparations. Researchers then counted the number of microbubbles which bound to the endothelial cells.

According to the study, binding of microbubbles to normal endothelial cells was minimal, however, there was a 40-fold increase in adherence of the microbubbles containing anti-ICAM-1 to the activated endothelial cells. These adherent microbubbles can then be detected using ultrasound imaging (echocardiography).

"This may allow us to localize an area of the artery where atherosclerosis is just developing so that we can intervene at a much earlier disease stage than is currently possible," said Dr. Wagner.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Pittsburgh Medical Center. "Study Findings May Lead To Earlier Diagnosis And Treatment Of Atherosclerosis." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 November 1997. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/11/971117064915.htm>.
University Of Pittsburgh Medical Center. (1997, November 17). Study Findings May Lead To Earlier Diagnosis And Treatment Of Atherosclerosis. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/11/971117064915.htm
University Of Pittsburgh Medical Center. "Study Findings May Lead To Earlier Diagnosis And Treatment Of Atherosclerosis." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/11/971117064915.htm (accessed September 20, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) A study suggest antidepressants can kick in much sooner than previously thought. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

AP (Sep. 19, 2014) A federal jury has convicted three people in connection with an outbreak of salmonella poisoning five years ago that sickened hundreds of people and was linked to a number of deaths. (Sept. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
How The 'Angelina Jolie Effect' Increased Cancer Screenings

How The 'Angelina Jolie Effect' Increased Cancer Screenings

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) Angelina's Jolie's decision to undergo a preventative mastectomy in 2013 inspired many women to seek early screenings for the disease. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins