Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Stroke Patients Benefit From Delayed Aerobic Exercise

Date:
April 27, 1998
Source:
University Of Maryland, Baltimore
Summary:
Contrary to conventional wisdom, aerobic exercise is a safe and effective way to improve the strength and cardiovascular fitness of stroke patients, even if they begin exercising six months or more after their stroke.

Contrary to conventional rehabilitation wisdom, aerobic exercise is a safe and effective way to improve the strength and cardiovascular fitness of stroke patients, even if they begin exercising six months or more after their stroke.

Related Articles


University of Maryland School of Medicine neurologist Richard F. Macko, MD, will present findings to an American Society of Neurorehabilitation meeting in Minneapolis today that contradict a widely held belief that most improvement in walking and other functional abilities occurs during the initial three to six months immediately following stroke. Conventional rehabilitation is concentrated in the first months after a stroke, a period when health care reimbursement is more likely to cover it, according to Macko.

An assistant professor of neurology and gerontology, Macko headed a six-month non-controlled study in Baltimore of 21 patients who had strokes that partially paralyzed one side of their bodies. Their average age was 67. All had their strokes at least six months before starting exercise training.

Patients with mild to moderate walking impairment exercised on a treadmill, starting with 15 minute sessions and increasing to 40 minutes. The treadmill training improved strength and increased peak fitness. It also improved floor-walking performance significantly, Macko reports. Aerobic exercise reduced the cardiovascular demands that walking makes on stroke patients. That is significant, he says, because the stroke patients tested had cardiovascular fitness levels about 40 percent lower than people of the same age who had not had a stroke.

"Stroke patients are aerobically disabled by poor fitness and the high-energy demands of walking," Macko explains. "Task-oriented aerobic exercise improves fitness and enhances functional mobility in patients with mild to moderate chronic hemiparesis (partial paralysis on one side)."

Stroke is the leading cause of disability in older Americans. Recent studies indicate that there are 731,000 strokes annually in the U.S., a number that is expected to nearly double over the next 50 years, as the baby boomers age. Approximately half of all stroke patients have neurologic deficits that affect their ability to walk normally, Macko says, and three out of four have cardiovascular problems as well. Because there is a high rate of cardiovascular disease in stroke patients, Macko recommends cardiac stress testing before starting aerobic training. Supervised low-intensity aerobic treadmill training lowers the oxygen demands made on the heart while walking, evidence that this form of exercise would be beneficial in stroke patients with coronary artery disease, he adds.

Future research should include randomized clinical trials to study the longterm effects of regular aerobic exercise and strength training as rehabilitation tools for stroke patients, the neurologist says. He adds: "Rehabilitation research needs to be integrated with cardiovascular and quality-of-life studies, health-care outcomes research, and cost/benefit analysis. I believe that would demonstrate the public health value of regular exercise as a way to restore mobility and reduce cardiovascular risk after stroke." Macko’s stroke research was conducted at the Baltimore VA Medical Center, a University of Maryland teaching hospital. It was supported in part by the National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health; the Geriatrics Research, Education and Clinical Center of the Baltimore VA; and a VA career development award.

The University of Maryland educates the majority of the state's doctors, lawyers, pharmacists and social workers and the majority of its dentists. In addition, nearly 90 percent of the graduates of the School of Nursing work in Maryland.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Maryland, Baltimore. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Maryland, Baltimore. "Stroke Patients Benefit From Delayed Aerobic Exercise." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 April 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/04/980427015841.htm>.
University Of Maryland, Baltimore. (1998, April 27). Stroke Patients Benefit From Delayed Aerobic Exercise. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 6, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/04/980427015841.htm
University Of Maryland, Baltimore. "Stroke Patients Benefit From Delayed Aerobic Exercise." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/04/980427015841.htm (accessed March 6, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, March 6, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Bupa Eyes India Healthcare Opportunities

Bupa Eyes India Healthcare Opportunities

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 5, 2015) Bupa is hoping to expand in India&apos;s fast-growing health insurance market, once a rule change on foreign investment is implemented. The British private healthcare group&apos;s CEO tells Grace Pascoe why it&apos;s so keen on the new opportunity. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Releases Last Ebola Patient, But Threat Remains

Liberia Releases Last Ebola Patient, But Threat Remains

Newsy (Mar. 5, 2015) Liberia&apos;s last Ebola patient has been released, and the country hasn&apos;t recorded a new case in a week. However, fears of another outbreak still exist. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor in Your Pocket Is Getting Smarter

Doctor in Your Pocket Is Getting Smarter

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 5, 2015) Mobile apps are turning smartphones into a personal doctors, with users able to measure heart rate, blood pressure and even blood sugar. But will it change our behaviour? Ivor Bennett reports from the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
AbbVie Inks $21B Deal To Buy Cancer Drugmaker Pharmacyclics

AbbVie Inks $21B Deal To Buy Cancer Drugmaker Pharmacyclics

Newsy (Mar. 5, 2015) AbbVie announced Wednesday it will buy cancer drugmaker Pharmacyclics in a $21 billion deal. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins