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Antibiotic Therapy Reduces Complications Of Unsuspected Meningococcal Disease

Date:
May 5, 1998
Source:
University Of Maryland, Baltimore
Summary:
Of children who are ultimately diagnosed with meningococcal disease, those who are given antibiotics before diagnosis have fewer complications than those who are not, according to research from the Boston Children's Hospital.
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A study by researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital reviewed the records of 441 children who were ultimately diagnosed with meningococcal disease. While most children with meningococcal disease show obvious signs of the disease and are hospitalized, some may have fever as their only symptom and be discharged to home. Of the 58 children in this study who fell into the latter category, those who received antibiotic therapy at their outpatient visit developed fewer complications than those who received no antibiotic therapy.The study was presented at the annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies in New Orleans, May 1-5. For interviews during the meeting, contact the press room at (504) 670-8502 or 670-8508.Researchers’ Institutional Contact: Office of Public Affairs (617) 355-6420


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The above post is reprinted from materials provided by University Of Maryland, Baltimore. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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University Of Maryland, Baltimore. "Antibiotic Therapy Reduces Complications Of Unsuspected Meningococcal Disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 May 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/04/980430104718.htm>.
University Of Maryland, Baltimore. (1998, May 5). Antibiotic Therapy Reduces Complications Of Unsuspected Meningococcal Disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 5, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/04/980430104718.htm
University Of Maryland, Baltimore. "Antibiotic Therapy Reduces Complications Of Unsuspected Meningococcal Disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/04/980430104718.htm (accessed July 5, 2015).

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