Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Improving Car Coatings From Scratch

Date:
August 28, 1998
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Two polymer researchers have developed a new way to show how "micro-scratches" tinier than a human hair, can hurt your car's clear coating, a step forward toward developing an improved generation of polymer coatings that will resist scratches. The new test methods were described here today (Aug. 27) at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society.

New Polymer Tests Show How "Micro-Scratches" Develop, Damage Clear Coats

BOSTON, Mass.--Two polymer researchers have developed a new way to show how "micro-scratches" tinier than a human hair, can hurt your car's clear coating, a step forward toward developing an improved generation of polymer coatings that will resist scratches. The new test methods were described here today (Aug. 27) at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society.

Dupont researchers Li Lin and Greg Blackman described how the new method permits them to examine tiny scratches as they develop in real time. Similar to the minuscule scratches that can occur when you wash your car, the micro-scratches are extremely tiny. "A human hair laid up against one of these scratches would dwarf it," Blackman says.

The combination of many of these tiny scratches allows light to scatter over the coating, making the damage visible to the human eye, and leading to what the two researchers call an "objectionable appearance" that doesn't meet the auto industry's goal that cars retain their visual appeal for 10 years.

Examining the mechanical properties of the polymer during the formation of such small scratches, or swirl marks as they are often called, required an analytical device that was not commercially available. Lin developed a unique micro-scratch tester that was then coupled with an atomic force microscope and a video camera, thereby allowing real-time examination of scratches as they developed.

One surprising finding for the scientists was that in the early stages of scratch formation there is no loss of material, or debris formation. Rather, small cracks appear and create voids in the surface of the coating, which cause the scattering of light.

Based on their work, new coatings that Blackman describes as "significantly better" already have been applied to some cars for field testing. The analytical device developed by Lin has been licensed for development by CSEM Instruments (Centre Suisse d'Electronique et de Microtechnique SA) of Switzerland.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Improving Car Coatings From Scratch." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 August 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/08/980828073112.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (1998, August 28). Improving Car Coatings From Scratch. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/08/980828073112.htm
American Chemical Society. "Improving Car Coatings From Scratch." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/08/980828073112.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Argentina's Tax Evaders Detected, Hunted Down by Drones

Argentina's Tax Evaders Detected, Hunted Down by Drones

AFP (Sep. 30, 2014) Argentina doesn't only have Lionel Messi the footballer, it has now also acquired "Mesi" the drone system which monitors undeclared mansions, swimming pools and soy fields to curb tax evasion in the country. Duration: 01:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Do Video Games Trump Brain Training For Cognitive Boosts?

Do Video Games Trump Brain Training For Cognitive Boosts?

Newsy (Sep. 29, 2014) More and more studies are showing positive benefits to playing video games, but the jury is still out on brain training programs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
CERN Celebrates 60 Years of Science

CERN Celebrates 60 Years of Science

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 29, 2014) CERN, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research, celebrates 60 years of bringing nations together through science. As Joanna Partridge reports from inside the famous science centre it's also planning to turn the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator back on after an upgrade. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
This 'Invisibility Cloak' Is Simpler Than Most

This 'Invisibility Cloak' Is Simpler Than Most

Newsy (Sep. 28, 2014) Researchers from the University of Rochester have created a type of invisibility cloak with simple focal lenses. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins