Science News
from research organizations

Improving Car Coatings From Scratch

Date:
August 28, 1998
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Two polymer researchers have developed a new way to show how "micro-scratches" tinier than a human hair, can hurt your car's clear coating, a step forward toward developing an improved generation of polymer coatings that will resist scratches. The new test methods were described here today (Aug. 27) at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society.
Share:
       
FULL STORY

New Polymer Tests Show How "Micro-Scratches" Develop, Damage Clear Coats

BOSTON, Mass.--Two polymer researchers have developed a new way to show how "micro-scratches" tinier than a human hair, can hurt your car's clear coating, a step forward toward developing an improved generation of polymer coatings that will resist scratches. The new test methods were described here today (Aug. 27) at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society.

Dupont researchers Li Lin and Greg Blackman described how the new method permits them to examine tiny scratches as they develop in real time. Similar to the minuscule scratches that can occur when you wash your car, the micro-scratches are extremely tiny. "A human hair laid up against one of these scratches would dwarf it," Blackman says.

The combination of many of these tiny scratches allows light to scatter over the coating, making the damage visible to the human eye, and leading to what the two researchers call an "objectionable appearance" that doesn't meet the auto industry's goal that cars retain their visual appeal for 10 years.

Examining the mechanical properties of the polymer during the formation of such small scratches, or swirl marks as they are often called, required an analytical device that was not commercially available. Lin developed a unique micro-scratch tester that was then coupled with an atomic force microscope and a video camera, thereby allowing real-time examination of scratches as they developed.

One surprising finding for the scientists was that in the early stages of scratch formation there is no loss of material, or debris formation. Rather, small cracks appear and create voids in the surface of the coating, which cause the scattering of light.

Based on their work, new coatings that Blackman describes as "significantly better" already have been applied to some cars for field testing. The analytical device developed by Lin has been licensed for development by CSEM Instruments (Centre Suisse d'Electronique et de Microtechnique SA) of Switzerland.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Improving Car Coatings From Scratch." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 August 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/08/980828073112.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (1998, August 28). Improving Car Coatings From Scratch. ScienceDaily. Retrieved June 30, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/08/980828073112.htm
American Chemical Society. "Improving Car Coatings From Scratch." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/08/980828073112.htm (accessed June 30, 2015).

Share This Page: