Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Fully Endoscopic Brain Surgery Done At Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Date:
October 26, 1998
Source:
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Summary:
A fully endoscopic procedure now available at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center's Skull Base Institute is resulting in minimally invasive, highly successful brain surgery for patients with pituitary tumors and other skull base disorders.

LOS ANGELES (October 23, 1998) - A fully endoscopic procedure now available at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center's Skull Base Institute is resulting in minimally invasive, highly successful brain surgery for patients with pituitary tumors and other skull base disorders.

According to Hrayr Shahinian, M.D., director of the Skull Base Institute, the new procedure utilizes a tiny endoscope -- 4mm wide and 20cm long -- with angled tips to provide a panoramic view of the brain. Because the point of entry is through a nostril, there is no scarring, the brain is undisturbed and both the time required for the actual surgical procedure, as well as the overall recovery time are dramatically reduced.

Of the approximately 12 Skull Base Institute patients who have undergone this type of delicate brain surgery in the past three months, virtually all have gone home within 48 hours of surgery and all have enjoyed rapid overall recovery.

"I stayed in the hospital for a couple of days, then went roller-blading nine days after I went home," says Ken Baker, 28, a staff correspondent for People magazine. Baker underwent the procedure on July 8, 1998, to remove a large (2.5cm) hormone-secreting prolactinoma.

Amelia Anderson, 41, a vice present at City National Bank in Beverly Hills, also enjoyed a rapid recovery. "I had the surgery on Monday, went home on Wednesday, and by Saturday I had begun daily walks down the block. Within a couple of weeks, I was driving," she says.

According to Dr. Shahinian, the new endoscopic technology provides surgeons with an unprecedented panoramic view of the tumor site, allowing them to look around corners and make a full visual assessment. "This enhanced visibility helps us know exactly how to best approach the tumor without disturbing the brain, itself," he says. "In any type of brain surgery, our goal is to disturb it (the brain) as little as possible -- to slip in and out without its knowing we were there, so to speak."

"The second thing the panoramic view provides is the ability to nearly always remove the tumor in its entirety. Prior to the availability of the panoramic view endoscopes, we could not always see or remove the whole tumor, as often a portion of it 'hides' around a corner. Now that we can see it fully, we can remove it fully."

Baker's tumor was a classic example, says Dr. Shahinian. "In his case, a portion of the tumor extended around a corner into the right cavernous sinus -- a very dangerous area. This represents a venous pool of blood that houses the internal carotid artery, one of the main sources of blood to the brain, as well as nerves that go to the eyes. Without the endoscope, it would have been impossible to see around the corner into this area, and it would have been too risky to try to enter the area blind. The upshot would have been that some of the tumor would have remained, and it would have eventually grown back, requiring additional surgery."

The advantages to the patient are numerous:

o No scarring ("I really like the fact that no one can look at me now and even know I had surgery," says Anderson.)

o No nasal packing.

o Shortened surgery time (At present about 2 hours compared to 4 hours for traditional pituitary surgery. Dr. Shahinian expects that time to shorten even more).

o Dramatically reduced length of stay in the hospital (At present, about 2 days compared to 5 days for traditional pituitary surgery. Dr. Shahinian anticipates that within the next two years, this may become a "same-day" surgery.)

o Less discomfort as the brain itself is not disturbedo Faster overall recovery, return to work and normal activities.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. "Fully Endoscopic Brain Surgery Done At Cedars-Sinai Medical Center." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 October 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/10/981026195848.htm>.
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. (1998, October 26). Fully Endoscopic Brain Surgery Done At Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/10/981026195848.htm
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. "Fully Endoscopic Brain Surgery Done At Cedars-Sinai Medical Center." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/10/981026195848.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Newsy (July 23, 2014) An 8-year-old boy helped his younger brother, who has a rare genetic condition that's confined him to a wheelchair, finish a triathlon. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The 83 new genetic markers could open dozens of new avenues for schizophrenia treatment research. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The new sci-fi thriller "Lucy" is making people question whether we really use all our brainpower. But, as scientists have insisted for years, we do. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Do Obese Women Have 'Food Learning Impairment'?

Do Obese Women Have 'Food Learning Impairment'?

Newsy (July 18, 2014) Yale researchers tested 135 men and women, and it was only obese women who were deemed to have "impaired associative learning." Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins