Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

NCAR Team Tags "Imported" Pollutants Over The Pacific Northwest

Date:
December 7, 1998
Source:
National Center For Atmospheric Research (NCAR)
Summary:
From 50% to 60% of sulfate-aerosol pollution over the Pacific Northwest is coming from industrialized Asia, according to a model developed by a team of researchers at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. In contrast, sulfates in Europe are coming primarily from European sources.

BOULDER--From 50% to 60% of sulfate-aerosol pollution over the PacificNorthwest is coming from industrialized Asia, according to a modeldeveloped by a team of researchers at the National Center forAtmospheric Research (NCAR). While the total column of air contains"imported" sulfate aerosols, near the surface most of the aerosols comefrom North American sources. In contrast, sulfates in Europe are comingprimarily from European sources, both at the surface and higher in theatmosphere. Jeffrey Kiehl, head of NCAR's Climate Modeling Section, willpresent the group's findings December 7 at the American GeophysicalUnion conference in San Francisco. Research funds came from the NationalAeronautics and Space Administration and the National ScienceFoundation. NSF is NCAR's primary sponsor.

"It's widely recognized that sulfate aerosols are playing a major rolein the climate system," says Kiehl. The ability of these aerosols (tinyparticles of liquids and solids) to reflect the sun's radiation may beone reason that increasing greenhouse gases have not warmed the earth asmuch as some climate models have predicted. Sulfates also contribute tolocal pollution and acid rain.

"One important way that sulfur moves in the atmosphere is throughtransport by the earth's winds," Kiehl explains. But winds are not thewhole story. For the past three years, Kiehl and colleagues Mary Barth,Philip Rasch, and Timothy Schneider have been developing an integratedmodel of climate and sulfur chemistry. The model includes the emissionof natural and industrial sulfur into the earth's atmosphere. To modelhow the sulfur gas changes into sulfate aerosol particles, they includedchemical processes and the chemical and physical effects of clouds,including clouds' ability to remove sulfates from the atmosphere. Theyalso included the effect of the sulfate aerosols on the reflection ofsunlight to address the key question of sulfates' role in the climatesystem. The researchers compared their model simulations of sulfur andsulfate aerosols with real-world observations near the surface. Morecomparisons with observations yet to be made far above the surface areneeded to confirm the model findings.

Fully integrating sulfur chemistry into the climate model allowed theteam to account for the effects of interacting winds, precipitation, andclouds on that chemistry. This integrated modeling allowed them tocalculate the amount of sulfate aerosols formed or removed in any givenregion. By tagging the sulfates in the climate simulations by sourceregion, the team could calculate the percent of sulfates transportedfrom one region to another. The source regions considered are NorthAmerica, Asia, and Europe, with the rest of the world grouped as thefourth region.

NCAR is managed by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research,a consortium of more than 60 universities offering Ph.D.s in atmosphericand related sciences.

-The End-

Writer: Zhenya Gallon

Find this news release on the World Wide Web at http://www.ucar.edu/publications/newsreleases/1998/sulfates.html

To receive UCAR and NCAR news releases by e-mail,telephone 303-497-8601 or e-mail butterwo@ucar.edu


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Center For Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Center For Atmospheric Research (NCAR). "NCAR Team Tags "Imported" Pollutants Over The Pacific Northwest." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 December 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/12/981207130405.htm>.
National Center For Atmospheric Research (NCAR). (1998, December 7). NCAR Team Tags "Imported" Pollutants Over The Pacific Northwest. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 3, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/12/981207130405.htm
National Center For Atmospheric Research (NCAR). "NCAR Team Tags "Imported" Pollutants Over The Pacific Northwest." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/12/981207130405.htm (accessed September 3, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Halliburton Reaches $1B Gulf Spill Settlement

Halliburton Reaches $1B Gulf Spill Settlement

AP (Sep. 2, 2014) Halliburton's agreement to pay more than $1 billion to settle numerous claims involving the 2010 BP oil spill could be a way to diminish years of costly litigation. A federal judge still has to approve the settlement. (Sept. 2) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Google Teases India Event, Possible Android One Reveal

Google Teases India Event, Possible Android One Reveal

Newsy (Sep. 1, 2014) Google has announced a Sept. 15 event in India during which they're expected to reveal their Android One phones. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Australian Airlines Relax Phone Ban Too

Australian Airlines Relax Phone Ban Too

Reuters - Business Video Online (Aug. 26, 2014) Qantas and Virgin say passengers can use their smartphones and tablets throughout flights after a regulator relaxed a ban on electronic devices during take-off and landing. As Hayley Platt reports the move comes as the two domestic rivals are expected to post annual net losses later this week. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hurricane Marie Brings Big Waves to California Coast

Hurricane Marie Brings Big Waves to California Coast

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 26, 2014) Huge waves generated by Hurricane Marie hit the Southern California coast. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins