Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Dendritic Cell Immunotherapy May Provide Cancer Patients With A Vaccine To Combat Malignant Brain Tumors

Date:
January 25, 1999
Source:
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Summary:
Dendritic cell immunotherapy, a process that uses a vaccine derived from a patient's own cells to fight malignant cells, is being used to treat brain tumors at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. The clinical protocol is based on research done in the laboratory at Cedars-Sinai, and was used for the first time in patient treatment on May 11, 1998, at the Cedars-Sinai Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute.

Los Angeles (January 21, 1999) -- Dendritic cell immunotherapy, a process that uses a vaccine derived from a patient's own cells to fight malignant cells, is being used to treat brain tumors at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. The clinical protocol is based on research done in the laboratory at Cedars-Sinai, and was used for the first time in patient treatment on May 11, 1998, at the Cedars-Sinai Maxine Dunitz Neurosurgical Institute.

Related Articles


According to Keith Black, M.D., principal investigator on the project and one of eight physicians and scientists who have been researching dendritic cell immunotherapy, foreign proteins are taken from a tumor after surgical removal. These proteins are introduced to antigen presenting (or dendritic) cells taken from the patient's blood and grown in a Petri dish. The new dendritic cells, when re-injected into the patient, are intended to work like a vaccine, recognizing and destroying the lingering malignant tumor cells. Several such injections are typically scheduled over a six-week period.

Barbara Boyajian was among the first patients to undergo the experimental procedure, having been diagnosed in early June 1998 with glioblastoma multiforme, one of the most aggressive types of brain tumor. She first noticed a problem when her memory lost its sharpness. Shortly thereafter, she says, she walked into a wall. Thinking she needed glasses, she visited an eye doctor and he suggested she schedule an MRI. The malignant tumor was diagnosed and confirmed by three medical opinions. "I ended up in Dr. Black's hands, which was a blessing," says Boyajian.

Dr. Black and his team removed the tumor on July 23, 1998, and a six-week course of radiation therapy followed. Dendritic cell immunotherapy, initiated on Nov. 16, was completed on Dec. 30. Boyajian's positive outlook helped her get through a difficult time. She feels fine now and returns to the Neurosurgical Institute only for follow-up lab work and MRIs. "We're on this side of the tracks," she says, "and we're real excited about it and I have a lot of support from my family and my friends. And I have a tremendous amount of faith."

Dendritic cell immunotherapy has been approved by the Food & Drug Administration for Phase I study and has been used in treating other types of tumors. Other Cedars-Sinai Medical Center physicians and scientists involved in the research include: John Yu, M.D.; Christopher Wheeler, Ph.D.; Reid Thompson, M.D.; Brian Pikul, M.D.; Paul Zeltzer, M.D.; Divina Nacis, R.N.; and Mary Riedinger, R.N.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. "Dendritic Cell Immunotherapy May Provide Cancer Patients With A Vaccine To Combat Malignant Brain Tumors." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 January 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/01/990125073302.htm>.
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. (1999, January 25). Dendritic Cell Immunotherapy May Provide Cancer Patients With A Vaccine To Combat Malignant Brain Tumors. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/01/990125073302.htm
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. "Dendritic Cell Immunotherapy May Provide Cancer Patients With A Vaccine To Combat Malignant Brain Tumors." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/01/990125073302.htm (accessed December 17, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

AFP (Dec. 17, 2014) Border closures, quarantines and crop losses in West African nations battling the Ebola virus could lead to as many as one million people going hungry, UN food agencies said on Wednesday. Duration: 00:52 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
When You Lose Weight, This Is Where The Fat Goes

When You Lose Weight, This Is Where The Fat Goes

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) Can fat disappear into thin air? New research finds that during weight loss, over 80 percent of a person's fat molecules escape through the lungs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Flu Outbreak Closing Schools in Ohio

Flu Outbreak Closing Schools in Ohio

AP (Dec. 17, 2014) A wave of flu illnesses has forced some Ohio schools to shut down over the past week. State officials confirmed one pediatric flu-related death, a 15-year-old girl in southern Ohio. (Dec. 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Feeling Young Might Mean A Longer Life Span

Feeling Young Might Mean A Longer Life Span

Newsy (Dec. 16, 2014) A study published in JAMA shows that people who feel younger than their chronological age might actually live longer than those who feel old. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins