Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Buckling Up Is Not Enough To Protect Children In Auto Accidents; Seat Belts And Child Safety Seats Must Be Used Properly

Date:
June 9, 1999
Source:
The Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia
Summary:
Although the fatality rate for child passengers in motor vehicle accidents dropped by 25% from 1977 to 1997, "fatality and injury rates have remained largely unchanged since 1990, according to researchers at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, who stress the need to address "second generation" problems of child passenger safety.

EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE:Tuesday, June 8, 1999 4:00 p.m., Eastern Daylight Time

Related Articles


PHILADELPHIA-Buckling up is not enough to protect children from serious injuries in automobile accidents; safety restraints such as child safety seats and seat belts must also be used properly. "The number of child passengers dying in auto crashes has dramatically declined in the past 20 years," said Flaura K. Winston, M.D., Ph.D., of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. "Far more children now ride in seat belts and child safety seats. But the next level of protection is to concentrate on the correct fit and most appropriate use of child restraint devices." Dr. Winston and Dennis R. Durbin, M.D., of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, wrote about child passenger safety in the July 9 Journal of the American Medical Association.

While the majority of children who die in motor vehicle crashes are not using car seats or restraint devices, 37% of children killed in 1997 were restrained, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Misusing child safety restraints reduces their effectiveness, said the authors, who stress that the best safety practices take a child's age and weight into account.

For instance, infants should ride in a rear-facing child safety seat until they reach one year and 20 pounds. Children aged one to four, between 20 and 40 pounds, should ride in a forward-facing car seat, not in a seat belt. "Premature graduation to safety belts raises the risk of 'seat belt syndrome,' injuries to the abdomen and spinal cord from an improperly positioned seat belt," said Dr. Durbin. Children over 4 years and 40 pounds should use a booster seat until about age 8, when they can properly use a seat belt without a booster seat. And for all children 12 years old and younger, "the safest place is in a vehicle's rear seat," added Dr. Winston.

Although the fatality rate for child passengers in motor vehicle accidents dropped by 25% from 1977 to 1997, "fatality and injury rates have remained largely unchanged since 1990," say the authors. "We need to address 'second generation' problems of child passenger safety, such as the best usage of safety restraints for each child's age and weight," said Dr. Winston.

Recommendations for current child safety practice draw on extensive research into motor vehicle accidents, including work by Partners for Child Passenger Safety, a joint project of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the State Farm Insurance Companies. Drs. Winston and Durbin are research leaders of the project, which has gathered information on thousands of injuries to children in motor vehicle accidents since June 1998. Although more than 90% of the children in accidents reported to the project were restrained, the safety restraints did not conform to best current practice in nearly half the cases. "The most serious injuries to children in car crashes are head injuries," said Dr. Winston, "and these are the most important injuries to prevent."

The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, the nation's first children's hospital, is a leader in patient care, education and research. This 406-bed multispecialty hospital provides comprehensive pediatric services to children from before birth through age 19.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

The Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia. "Buckling Up Is Not Enough To Protect Children In Auto Accidents; Seat Belts And Child Safety Seats Must Be Used Properly." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 June 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/06/990607173710.htm>.
The Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia. (1999, June 9). Buckling Up Is Not Enough To Protect Children In Auto Accidents; Seat Belts And Child Safety Seats Must Be Used Properly. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/06/990607173710.htm
The Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia. "Buckling Up Is Not Enough To Protect Children In Auto Accidents; Seat Belts And Child Safety Seats Must Be Used Properly." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/06/990607173710.htm (accessed November 29, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, November 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Rural India's Low-Cost Sanitary Pad Revolution

Rural India's Low-Cost Sanitary Pad Revolution

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — One man hopes his invention -– a machine that produces cheap sanitary pads –- will help empower Indian women. Duration: 01:51 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — In Africa's only biosafety level 4 laboratory, scientists have been carrying out experiments on bats to understand how virus like Ebola are being transmitted, and how some of them resist to it. Duration: 01:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO Says Male Ebola Survivors Should Abstain From Sex

WHO Says Male Ebola Survivors Should Abstain From Sex

Newsy (Nov. 28, 2014) — WHO cites four studies that say Ebola can still be detected in semen up to 82 days after the onset of symptoms. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins