Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Seasonal And Holiday Allergy Tips From National Jewish Medical And Research Center

Date:
October 18, 1999
Source:
National Jewish Medical And Research Center
Summary:
Get Ready for Festivities and Flare-ups: Seasonal and Holiday Allergy Tips from National Jewish Medical and Research Center

Seasonal Fluctuations

DENVER-“Allergies are often seasonal,” says Dan Atkins, M.D., medical director of the Pediatric Care Unit at National Jewish Medical and Research Center. “The symptoms fluctuate, disappear and reoccur, based on the season. It’s important to have an action plan for each time of year and be aware of the triggers.”

Molds that plague allergy sufferers nestle snugly into the colorful fall landscape. Exposure to molds can dampen autumn tasks such as raking leaves and composting. To avoid allergic reactions, wear a filter mask or let someone else handle outdoor chores.

In addition, cool fall and winter air can be a cause of asthma attacks. “Pre-treat if you know that cold air causes flare-ups,” Dr. Atkins advises. “Take your medications before going out, and wear a scarf to cover your nose and mouth.” Indoor air can cause problems as furnaces and heating systems suddenly come to life on chilly fall nights. “Have the system cleaned and change the filters,” Dr. Atkins advises, “so that the furnace doesn’t blow out dust the first time you turn it on.”

Halloween Allergen Safeguards

Halloween can scare up more than ghosts and goblins for children with allergies. “There are many setups for reactions,” Dr. Atkins says. “Some children have food allergies. When trick-or-treating, kids often eat candy as they go. Prepare snacks for food allergic kids so they’ll have something safe to munch on as they go from house to house. Have a responsible parent along. He or she can carry medications in case of a reaction.”Once the ghosts and goblins return home, go through the treats and remove any to which your child may have allergies.

Holiday Food, Festivities and Gifts

At Thanksgiving, Chanukah and Christmas, family and friends gather in celebration. “People are hugging and kissing hello and goodbye,” Dr. Atkins notes, “and, unfortunately, respiratory viruses get passed around. If you have a cold, use good judgment about close physical contact.”

Food preparation is an issue for those with food allergies. “Maybe you can eat your own turkey dressing,” Dr. Atkins says, “but you go to a party where the hostess makes hers with walnuts and you’re allergic to walnuts. In extreme cases, you may have to bring your own meal. But generally, it’s sufficient to let the hostess know, especially if kids have food allergies. Call ahead. Take time to be prepared.”

Chanukah and Christmas gifts are seasonal delights, but talk to parents of kids with allergies before shopping. “Let parents make the decision about gifts such as stuffed animals or live pets that can trigger allergic reactions,” Dr. Atkins advises. “Look for toys that don’t have strong odors associated with them.”

Christmas Trees and Decorations

Christmas trees are often cited as the source of allergy attacks during the holidays, but molds, associated with watering live trees, and the chemicals sprayed on the trees are more likely irritants. “The Christmas tree issue is overemphasized,” Dr. Atkins says. He finds very few cases among allergy patients in which the tree is the culprit. Allergic reactions usually occur shortly after an encounter with an allergen, such as dust mites or molds.

Unpacking the Christmas ornaments can trigger allergic reactions. “Decorations stored for the past year in a damp basement harbor molds, dust mites and other allergens,” Dr. Atkins says. “Moving, carrying and unpacking the Christmas boxes stirs up dust and transfers allergens to the hands and the respiratory system. People are first aware of the symptoms while decorating the Christmas tree and assume that the tree is the cause.

“Keep ornaments and decorations stored in dry areas, off the floor, in plastic bags,” he advises. “Wash your hands after unpacking decorations. If you’re very concerned about allergy symptoms, allow others to trim the tree.” Artificial trees can be a good alternative, depending on storage. “If it’s sitting in pieces on the basement or attic floor for a year,” Dr. Atkins says, “the tree will collect dust and mold. Just remember to keep it sealed in a plastic bag in an area free of dust and moisture.”

The Number 1 Respiratory Hospital in the U.S. for Two Consecutive Years, U.S. News & World Report, 1998-2000.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Jewish Medical And Research Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Jewish Medical And Research Center. "Seasonal And Holiday Allergy Tips From National Jewish Medical And Research Center." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 October 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/10/991015160304.htm>.
National Jewish Medical And Research Center. (1999, October 18). Seasonal And Holiday Allergy Tips From National Jewish Medical And Research Center. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/10/991015160304.htm
National Jewish Medical And Research Center. "Seasonal And Holiday Allergy Tips From National Jewish Medical And Research Center." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/10/991015160304.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

AP (July 22, 2014) Two federal appeals courts issued conflicting rulings Tuesday on the legality of the federally-run healthcare exchange that operates in 36 states. (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The new sci-fi thriller "Lucy" is making people question whether we really use all our brainpower. But, as scientists have insisted for years, we do. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Newsy (July 22, 2014) Boston scientists have discovered a new way to create fully functioning human platelets using a bioreactor and human stem cells. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

TheStreet (July 21, 2014) New research shows Gilead Science's drug Sovaldi helps in curing hepatitis C in those who suffer from HIV. In a medical study, the combination of Gilead's Hep C drug with anti-viral drug Ribavirin cured 76% of HIV-positive patients suffering from the most common hepatitis C strain. Hepatitis C and related complications have been a top cause of death in HIV-positive patients. Typical medication used to treat the disease, including interferon proteins, tended to react badly with HIV drugs. However, Sovaldi's %1,000-a-pill price tag could limit the number of patients able to access the treatment. TheStreet's Keris Lahiff reports from New York. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins