Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Nanotubes Show Promise From TVs To Velcro

Date:
March 6, 2000
Source:
Michigan State University
Summary:
Nanotubes, once considered the waste material that sat at the bottom of chambers used for making bucky balls, are being looked at with newfound respect by physicists, electrical engineers, and computer and materials scientists.

EAST LANSING, Mich. -- Remember the bucky ball? The carbon-based molecular structure that gained fame in K--12 classrooms everywhere. The problem was, as much as Tom Brokaw and Bill Nye sang its praises, no one could really tell what the bucky ball could be used for. We're still trying to figure it out, in fact.

Enter the bucky ball's illegitimate son, the nanotube.

Nanotubes, once considered the waste material that sat at the bottom of chambers used for making bucky balls, are being looked at with newfound respect by physicists, electrical engineers, and computer and materials scientists. What's more, their applications seem to be growing as fast as the nanotubes themselves, such as:

* Television the depth of a framed print that uses far less power than present-day FED's, where silicon does the electron-emitting.

* Nano-memory: Computer memory that's 1,000 times smaller than what currently is possible.

* Nano-Velcro: which could be 100 times stronger, and 10 times lighter, than steel.

Nanotubes are not a new form of carbon; they combine the molecular configurations of graphite and bucky balls, taking advantage of the properties of both. The tube is formed when two ends of graphite join together--like chicken wire around a post--and half a bucky ball attaches at each end. Although nanotubes could feasibly grow to lengths ad infinitum, the simplest model looks something like a quilted cold capsule.

"The synthesis of bucky balls and nanotubes generally produce very small quantities," explains David Tomanek, professor of physics at Michigan State. He and electrical and computer engineers Virginia Ayres and Dean Aslam are embarking on a project to grow and study nanotubes for use in consumer-related applications.

Ayres and Aslam extol the virtues of both diamonds and nanotubes, proposing that, in some cases, a diamond--nanotube hybrid might be the best bet. Such is the case with field emission displays (FED), also referred to as flat-panel displays, a new technology that could revolutionize the way televisions are manufactured.

The reason a television currently occupies so much space in the living room is because three electron guns are firing electrons from the back, line by line, at individual pixels on the screen. Electrons hit the phosphor pixels, and, wham! Homer Simpson is yelling at Bart. Applied to FED technology, molecule-sized nanotubes would emit the electrons instead of the electron guns, with the precision of one nanotube per pixel. The result would be a television the depth of a framed print that, if Ayres and Aslam have it their way, uses far less power than present-day FED's, where silicon does the electron-emitting.

A material's ability to emit electrons is defined by two things: one, the electrical field at the surface (the number of electrons that are buzzing around), and two, the amount of work required to coax the electrons out, called the work function.

Aslam says that for materials with high work functions, like silicon or most metals, sharp edges must be formed to amplify the electrical field at the tip. "If you use a material that has almost zero work function--and that's diamond--then you don't have to make a tip," he says. "But," he adds, "if you can make a tip on top of that..."

"Better still!" Ayres said. "This is a good thing because to generate the field that takes the electrons out, we need a power supply; so one of the things that we want to do is reduce that power supply requirement. Otherwise, we have a thin screen, but an enormous, massive power supply. We've defeated our purpose."

For their project, Ayres will be studying the fine line that exists between diamonds and nanotubes by examining the conditions necessary for their growth. Aslam will be conducting the field-emission studies and examining some of the most pervasive questions, namely what is the principal electron-emitting mechanism, and why is emission from diamond, though low in work function, non-uniform in pattern? Tomanek will perform the computer modeling. The three are collaborating with DuPont and NASA Goddard Space Center in their research.

In addition to their use in field emission displays, nanotubes show promise for other applications, says Richard Enbody, associate professor of computer science and engineering. He and Tomanek have applied for two patents that make creative use out of several of the extraordinary properties of nanotubes: nano-memory and nano-Velcro.

"Since all computers are based on the binary system, they only have two states: you can call one of the states 'zero' and one of them 'one,'" explains Enbody. "Therefore, any computer memory, whether it's on a CD ROM, or floppy disk, or hard drive, or RAM, has two states: on and off--zero and one. That's the whole basis for computer memories."

Enbody and Tomanek reason that by putting a bucky ball inside a nanotube, and by getting the bucky ball to slide from one end, the "zero" state, to the other, the "one" state, computer memory could be derived at the smallest known scale.

"This has the potential of making a memory that's 1,000 times smaller than what we have," Enbody said.

Enbody and Tomanek's other idea, nano-Velcro, or the micro-fastener system, makes use of the inimitable strength of nanotubes, 100 times stronger (and ten times lighter) than steel, and its temperature-resistance, up to 3,000 degrees Kelvin (nearly 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit). They are proposing a hook and loop system, similar to the Velcro flap on a tennis shoe, that uses nanotubes instead. To Enbody and Tomanek, nano-Velcro could be used to manufacture anything--from space shuttles to micro-robots--and would require the same force necessary to form diamond to pull the two sides apart.

"This is about research, Tomanek said. "This is about the next century. This is where we are going."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Michigan State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Michigan State University. "Nanotubes Show Promise From TVs To Velcro." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 March 2000. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/03/000306075508.htm>.
Michigan State University. (2000, March 6). Nanotubes Show Promise From TVs To Velcro. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/03/000306075508.htm
Michigan State University. "Nanotubes Show Promise From TVs To Velcro." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/03/000306075508.htm (accessed September 1, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Monday, September 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Australian Airlines Relax Phone Ban Too

Australian Airlines Relax Phone Ban Too

Reuters - Business Video Online (Aug. 26, 2014) Qantas and Virgin say passengers can use their smartphones and tablets throughout flights after a regulator relaxed a ban on electronic devices during take-off and landing. As Hayley Platt reports the move comes as the two domestic rivals are expected to post annual net losses later this week. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hurricane Marie Brings Big Waves to California Coast

Hurricane Marie Brings Big Waves to California Coast

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 26, 2014) Huge waves generated by Hurricane Marie hit the Southern California coast. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chinese Researchers Might Be Creating Supersonic Submarine

Chinese Researchers Might Be Creating Supersonic Submarine

Newsy (Aug. 26, 2014) Chinese researchers have expanded on Cold War-era tech and are closer to building a submarine that could reach the speed of sound. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Breakingviews: India Coal Strained by Supreme Court Ruling

Breakingviews: India Coal Strained by Supreme Court Ruling

Reuters - Business Video Online (Aug. 26, 2014) An acute coal shortage is likely to be aggravated as India's supreme court declared government coal allocations illegal, says Breakingviews' Peter Thal Larsen. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins