Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Liquid Cement Can Stop The Pain And Prevent Deformity From Osteoporosis Of The Spine

Date:
April 4, 2000
Source:
University Of Maryland Medical Center
Summary:
The pain and disfigurement of osteoporosis of the spine may be prevented with the help of a liquid bone cement, according to new findings being presented by University of Maryland Medical Center radiologists at the 25th Annual Meeting of the Society of Cardiovascular & Interventional Radiology (SCVIR) in San Diego, CA on March 28.

The pain and disfigurement of osteoporosis of the spine may be prevented with the help of a liquid bone cement, according to new findings being presented by University of Maryland Medical Center radiologists at the 25th Annual Meeting of the Society of Cardiovascular & Interventional Radiology (SCVIR) in San Diego, CA on March 28.

In a minimally invasive procedure called percutaneous vertebroplasty, sterile liquid cement, with the consistency of toothpaste, is injected into the fractured vertebral bodies of the spine. The cement fills the tiny holes and crevasses and strengthens the collapsed vertebrae, relieving pressure and pain.

"Vertebroplasty may also prevent severe deformity due to repeated fractures," says Gregg Zoarski, M.D., director of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology at the University of Maryland Medical Center and associate professor of Radiology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. Dr. Zoarski is the lead investigator for the study.

After an initial fracture, typically there's a loss of 20 to 30 percent of the height of the vertebral body within the spine. Over several weeks, more fractures may occur and the vertebral body may collapse even further until eventually there's a 70 to 90 percent loss of height.

"Gradually, the back hunches over and the person loses height, especially if several vertebrae are involved," says Dr. Zoarski. "If we treat patients soon after each fracture, we can minimize their deformity," Dr. Zoarski says.

In the six-month study, 30 patients were treated with vertebroplasty. Immediately after the procedure, 29 out of the 30 patients reported significant pain relief. Patients answered questions about their level of pain and physical and mental functions several hours before and two weeks after the procedure. Eighty percent reported significant and durable pain relief two weeks after having vertebroplasty. The procedure takes less than an hour and the patient receives only mild sedation. None of the patients in the study had gotten better with conventional therapy consisting of bed rest and pain relievers.

"Vertebroplasty is most often used to treat vertebrae in the lower and mid-spine which are prone to fracture when they become brittle. In a third of the cases, the bone is so weak that the fracture may occur when the patient is simply rolling out of bed or coughing," says Dr. Zoarski.

"Often, because the patient can't recall a specific trauma, osteoporotic vertebral fractures are frequently diagnosed incorrectly as muscle spasm," he says.

Ten million Americans have osteoporosis, a disease that causes 700,000 vertebral fractures annually, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation.

Osteoporosis causes bones to become more fragile and break easier. It is a disease that leads to more than twice the number of vertebral fractures as hip fractures. Those most at risk of osteoporosis are women over age 50 or individuals taking certain drugs such as steroids that accelerate bone mineral loss.

Patients who are candidates for percutaneous vertebroplasty undergo MRI tests to make sure their pain is caused by the fracture and not by other back problems such as herniated disc or compression of the spinal cord. The cement is injected into the spine with a needle. Doctors use x-rays to guide them. The cement then hardens after about 20 minutes and is permanent. The cement does not impair mobility of the spine and patients can move normally once the cement is in place.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Maryland Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Maryland Medical Center. "Liquid Cement Can Stop The Pain And Prevent Deformity From Osteoporosis Of The Spine." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 April 2000. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/03/000331091951.htm>.
University Of Maryland Medical Center. (2000, April 4). Liquid Cement Can Stop The Pain And Prevent Deformity From Osteoporosis Of The Spine. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/03/000331091951.htm
University Of Maryland Medical Center. "Liquid Cement Can Stop The Pain And Prevent Deformity From Osteoporosis Of The Spine." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/03/000331091951.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

AFP (Sep. 1, 2014) Wedged between buses, lorries and cars, cycling in London isn't for the faint hearted. Nevertheless the number of people choosing to bike in the British capital has doubled over the past 15 years. Duration: 02:27 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Can You Train Your Brain To Eat Healthy?

Newsy (Sep. 1, 2014) New research says if you condition yourself to eat healthy foods, eventually you'll crave them instead of junk food. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

AFP (Aug. 30, 2014) Authorities in Liberia try to stem the spread of the Ebola epidemic by raising awareness and setting up sanitation units for people to wash their hands. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins