Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Menstrual Function Develops More Rapidly Than Previously Thought

Date:
May 12, 2000
Source:
Penn State
Summary:
New research from Penn State's College of Medicine shows that the menstrual function develops rapidly after the first period (menarche), accompanied by a burst of hormones and no increase in the percent of body fat.

Hershey, Pa. --- New research from Penn State's College of Medicine shows that the menstrual function develops rapidly after the first period (menarche), accompanied by a burst of hormones and no increase in the percent of body fat.

Related Articles


This new information is counter to previous studies, indicating that maturation of the reproductive process is gradual lasting from 4 to 6 years and was accompanied by an increase in percent body fat.

"These results suggests that not only has the age of menarche progressively dropped, but there may also be an acceleration in the rate of development during the years surrounding menarche," explains Richard S. Legro, M.D., associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology. "It also holds important implications for adolescent pregnancy and initiation of contraception for women immediately after menarche."

Legro and his colleagues' paper titled, "Rapid Maturation of the Reproductive Axis During Perimenarche Independent of Body Composition," is published in the March issue of The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

Legro and his colleagues studied 112 premenarchal (prior to the beginning of menstrual function) young women. The four-year study obtained detailed reproductive and dietary histories of the subjects, measured body composition, and also quantified reproductive hormones with urine samples.

The study found that the percentage of body fat did not change appreciably ranging from 21 to 24 percent and was unrelated to menarche (the beginning of the menstrual function). Legro and his colleagues also report that sex steroid and gonadotropin levels increased suddenly in the year approaching menarche. In the first year after menarche, 65 percent of these adolescent women had established a pattern of 10 or more menstrual episodes per year, and within 3 years postmenarche this figure exceeded 90 percent.

"The strength of our study is the regular follow-up of a large group of young women recruited before menarche, with good study retention and intensive evaluation. During the study 79 percent of the participants remained in the study," states the Penn State College of Medicine researcher.

"This is a retention rate far exceeding those in previous studies of this type." Legro added, "The transition in a female's life from adolescence to menstruating woman is still not fully understood, yet it is as important as the transition from menstruating woman to menopausal woman."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Penn State. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Penn State. "Menstrual Function Develops More Rapidly Than Previously Thought." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 May 2000. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/05/000512082726.htm>.
Penn State. (2000, May 12). Menstrual Function Develops More Rapidly Than Previously Thought. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/05/000512082726.htm
Penn State. "Menstrual Function Develops More Rapidly Than Previously Thought." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/05/000512082726.htm (accessed December 22, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, December 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) A touch-free phone developed in Israel enables the mobility-impaired to operate smart phones with just a movement of the head. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) Polish scientists isolate bacteria from earthworm intestines which they say may be used in antibiotics and cancer treatments. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Existing Chemical Compounds Could Revive Failing Antibiotics, Says Danish Scientist

Existing Chemical Compounds Could Revive Failing Antibiotics, Says Danish Scientist

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) A team of scientists led by Danish chemist Jorn Christensen says they have isolated two chemical compounds within an existing antipsychotic medication that could be used to help a range of failing antibiotics work against killer bacterial infections, such as Tuberculosis. Jim Drury went to meet him. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hugging It Out Could Help You Ward Off A Cold

Hugging It Out Could Help You Ward Off A Cold

Newsy (Dec. 21, 2014) Carnegie Mellon researchers found frequent hugs can help people avoid stress-related illnesses. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins