Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Layered Polymer Films Can Be "Erased" By External Stimuli

Date:
October 12, 2000
Source:
University Of Illinois At Urbana-Champaign
Summary:
Scientists at the University of Illinois have fabricated ultrathin organic films that can be stacked together and “erased” by environmental stimuli. The erasable polymer multilayers could have applications in many diverse fields ranging from medicine to materials science.

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Scientists at the University of Illinois have fabricated ultrathin organic films that can be stacked together and “erased” by environmental stimuli. The erasable polymer multilayers could have applications in many diverse fields ranging from medicine to materials science.

“We specifically designed this material so that when it is placed in the desired environment, it would readily dissolve and release embedded agents such as drugs,” said Steve Granick, a professor of materials science at the UI and a researcher at the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory on campus. “We can control the durability of the material through the application of external stimuli.” To make their erasable material, Granick and postdoctoral research associate Svetlana Sukhishvili build up, layer by layer, very thin films of alternating polymeric acids and bases on a germanium crystal. The films also could be deposited on other materials, such as glass, mica or Teflon. Foreign compounds can be added to the layers as they are formed.

“By adding additional layers, we not only increase the amount of the embedded compound, we also make the material more stable, robust and resistant to attack in unwanted environments,” Granick said. Assembly of the films is guided by hydrogen bonding. “One unique aspect of the assembly process is reversibility,” Granick said. “The resulting multilayers can be selectively destroyed after they are created.”

The controlled destruction of the material can be initiated by a change in pH (the degree of acidity or alkalinity of a solution), the application of an external electric field or by a change in a surrounding salt concentration (both of which break the material’s ionic bonds).

“The release of an embedded compound occurs when the multilayer films are exposed to appropriate environmental conditions that erase them,” Granick said. “A drug, for example, could be released in a patient’s stomach or at the site of a wound, depending on the desired pH.”

Similarly, an electronic sensor could immediately release an embedded agent by applying an electric field and dissolving the material. Although the work is still a long way from any practical application, “the concept can be used to design the deliberate and controlled release of foreign agents that have been embedded within the material,” Granick said.

The researchers demonstrated proof of principle by embedding molecules of the dye Rhodamine 6G in the multilayer films and then releasing them by erasing the films through appropriate stimuli.

Granick and Sukhishvili described their erasable polymer films in the Sept. 14 online version of the Journal of the American Chemical Society.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Illinois At Urbana-Champaign. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Illinois At Urbana-Champaign. "Layered Polymer Films Can Be "Erased" By External Stimuli." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 October 2000. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/10/001009105438.htm>.
University Of Illinois At Urbana-Champaign. (2000, October 12). Layered Polymer Films Can Be "Erased" By External Stimuli. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/10/001009105438.htm
University Of Illinois At Urbana-Champaign. "Layered Polymer Films Can Be "Erased" By External Stimuli." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/10/001009105438.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Creative Makeovers for Ugly Cellphone Towers

Creative Makeovers for Ugly Cellphone Towers

AP (July 24, 2014) Mobile phone companies and communities across the country are going to new lengths to disguise those unsightly cellphone towers. From a church bell tower to a flagpole, even a pencil, some towers are trying to make a point. (July 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robot Parking Valet Creates Stress-Free Travel

Robot Parking Valet Creates Stress-Free Travel

AP (July 23, 2014) 'Ray' the robotic parking valet at Dusseldorf Airport in Germany lets travelers to avoid the hassle of finding a parking spot before heading to the check-in desk. (July 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Boeing Ups Outlook on 52% Profit Jump

Boeing Ups Outlook on 52% Profit Jump

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 23, 2014) Commercial aircraft deliveries rose seven percent at Boeing, prompting the aerospace company to boost full-year profit guidance- though quarterly revenues missed analyst estimates. Bobbi Rebell reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Europe's Car Market on the Rebound?

Europe's Car Market on the Rebound?

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 23, 2014) Daimler kicks off a round of second-quarter earnings results from Europe's top carmakers with a healthy set of numbers - prompting hopes that stronger sales in Europe will counter weakness in emerging markets. Hayley Platt reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins