Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Gemini Cuts Deep Into Galactic Core With Release Of First Data

Date:
October 17, 2000
Source:
National Science Foundation
Summary:
The first scientific observations from the Gemini North telescope provide a dramatic glimpse into the elusive core of the Milky Way, including an intriguing bow-shock from a star as it plows into a poorly understood gas cloud a mere three light-years from the galactic center.

The first scientific observations from the Gemini North telescope provide a dramatic glimpse into the elusive core of the Milky Way, including an intriguing bow-shock from a star as it plows into a poorly understood gas cloud a mere three light-years from the galactic center.

Long-suspected of harboring a huge black hole, the center of the Milky Way is a beehive of activity, with hapless stars flung around the core at tremendous speeds.

"There has a been a buzz of increased interest by astronomers lately in looking at the properties of the core," says UCLA Astronomer Dr. Andrea Ghez, whose work over several years at the W.M. Keck Observatory is responsible for pinpointing the exact location of the central black hole. "With this excellent science quality data, Gemini has demonstrated its many unique capabilities for studying our galaxy and beyond. It is a remarkable new tool in our toolbox for exploring the universe."

The Gemini Observatory is managed by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation (NSF). The NSF also serves as the executive agency for the international partnership.

The object, known by the unglamorous name of IRS8, was only an ill-defined smudge until Gemini came along. Now, the Gemini telescope’s advanced optics show that IRS8 appears to be a star that is plowing through a poorly understood gas and dust cloud near the galactic center. Moving relative to the cloud, the star creates a very obvious bow-shock wave, similar to the wave that forms in front of a boat as it goes through water.

This finding could alter scientists' understanding of the center of our galaxy once astronomers determine how the star and gas cloud are moving relative to each other. By studying this interaction, the properties of the gas cloud and the conditions surrounding the star will be better understood and provide a valuable new tool for probing the intense conditions near the center of our galaxy.

The image released today represents only a fraction of the total data available to scientists from this study. "Never before have we seen such a large area of the galactic center this clearly," said Dr. François Rigaut of the Gemini Observatory who led the project. "The data is also being released to scientists worldwide regardless of affiliation so that astronomers can make the most of this data as quickly as possible."

However, it will still take some time before astronomers will be able to dig out all of the treasures buried in this initial digital gold mine of data. "This is the first scientific data to be released to the astronomical community by the Gemini Observatory," says Director Dr. Matt Mountain, "and to be able to release such a spectacular image and data set shows the tremendous potential of these telescopes."

The data was taken at several infrared wavelengths and combined to create a "color" image. The remarkable sharpness of the image is due to a technology called adaptive optics that actually corrects for distortions to starlight caused by turbulence in the Earth’s atmosphere. The adaptive optics instrument used is called Hokupa'a and was built by the University of Hawaii, Institute for Astronomy and funded through an NSF grant.

Observing the galactic center is especially difficult because its light must travel through thousands of light-years of gas and dust before we can see it from our perch in the galactic suburbs. Only a small portion of the light ever makes it to our planet and most of that is in the infrared (or heat) part of the spectrum. The Gemini Observatory has been designed to make the most of the trickle of infrared radiation from space by using sophisticated new technologies like adaptive optics and infrared optimization that capitalize on the ideal infrared conditions at Mauna Kea.

The data was obtained over several nights in July and August as part of a preliminary science testing period as the Gemini North telescope nears completion on Mauna Kea in Hawaii.

The Gemini 8-meter Observatory Project is a multi-national collaboration that will provide two nearly identical eight-meter telescopes to an international community of astronomers. Both telescopes will incorporate new technologies that allow large, relatively thin mirrors to collect and focus both optical and infrared radiation from space -- at times with even more clarity than is possible with the Hubble Space Telescope. The telescopes are located on Hawaii's Mauna Kea (Gemini North) and the other on Cerro Pachón in central Chile (Gemini South), and hence will provide full sky coverage. Gemini North is nearing full scientific operations early in the year 2001 and Gemini South will follow about six months later.

The Gemini Observatory provides the astronomical communities in each of seven partner countries with state-of-the-art astronomical facilities that will allocate observing time in proportion to each country's contribution. In addition to financial support, each country also contributes significant scientific and technical resources.

Other research agencies that form the Gemini partnership include: the UK Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC), the Canadian National Research Council (NRC), the Chilean Comisión Nacional de Investigación Cientifica y Tecnológica (CONICYT), the Australian Research Council (ARC), the Argentinean Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) and the Brazilian Conselho Nacional de Pesquisas Cientificas e Tecnológicas (CNPq).

###

For high-resolution images, see: http://www.gemini.edu/galactic.html

For details on adaptive optics see: http://www.gemini.edu/public/adaptive.html


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Science Foundation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Science Foundation. "Gemini Cuts Deep Into Galactic Core With Release Of First Data." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 October 2000. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/10/001017073415.htm>.
National Science Foundation. (2000, October 17). Gemini Cuts Deep Into Galactic Core With Release Of First Data. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/10/001017073415.htm
National Science Foundation. "Gemini Cuts Deep Into Galactic Core With Release Of First Data." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/10/001017073415.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Space & Time News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

French Apple Fans Discover the Apple Watch

French Apple Fans Discover the Apple Watch

AFP (Sep. 30, 2014) — Apple fans in France discover the latest toy, the Apple Watch. The watch comes in two sizes and an array of interchangeable, fashionable wrist straps. Duration: 00:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Water You Drink Might Be Older Than The Sun

The Water You Drink Might Be Older Than The Sun

Newsy (Sep. 27, 2014) — Researchers at the University of Michigan simulated the birth of planets and our sun to determine whether water in the solar system predates the sun. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
First Woman Cosmonaut in 17 Years Blasts Off for ISS

First Woman Cosmonaut in 17 Years Blasts Off for ISS

AFP (Sep. 26, 2014) — A Russian Soyuz spacecraft carrying an American astronaut and two Russian cosmonauts, including the first woman cosmonaut in 17 years, blasted off on schedule Friday. Duration: 00:35 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Water Discovery On Small Planet Could Be Key To Earth 2.0

Water Discovery On Small Planet Could Be Key To Earth 2.0

Newsy (Sep. 25, 2014) — Scientists have discovered traces of water in the atmosphere of a distant, Neptune-sized planet. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins