Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Oral Contraceptive Use Does Not Affect Bone Mass

Date:
November 29, 2000
Source:
Penn State
Summary:
New research from Penn State College of Medicine shows that oral contraceptive pill (OCP) use by healthy teenage females does not affect their peak bone mass, or their growth.

Hershey, Pa. --- New research from Penn State College of Medicine shows that oral contraceptive pill (OCP) use by healthy teenage females does not affect their peak bone mass, or their growth.

Related Articles


Peak hip bone mineral density is achieved in late adolescence, usually by age 16. In this study, participants had their total body and hip bone density measured with using a DXA scanner. Bone density and bone mass was measured to see if there was any change caused by OCP use.

The study involved 62 white females who were studied from ages 12 to 20. There were 28 young women who used birth control pills for at least 6 months and were still using at age 20, with the average duration of use of 22 months; and 34 non-users. They are part of the Penn State Young Women's Health Study, which is a prospective epidemiological study that began in 1990 and believed to be the largest study of its kind.

Tom Lloyd, professor of health evaluation sciences and obstetrics and gynecology, said, "There was no difference in bone density between the two groups. This is good news because hormones in OCPs might, in theory, affect bone density, and peak bone mass is important in preventing osteoporosis later in life."

He notes that while there has been extensive research with older women on the use of OCPs and bone density, no previous studies have been conducted with teenaged women.

"We know that young women in particular are also very concerned about undesirable body changes," says Lloyd. "The average woman gains 40 to 50 percent of her skeletal mass – approximately 1,000 grams of bone mass during adolescence."

Lloyd, also director, Penn State Young Women's Health Study; Denise Taylor, clinical research coordinator; Hung Mo Lin, biostatistician and assistant professor of health evaluation sciences; Amy Matthews, biostatistical analyst; Douglas Eggil, associate professor of radiology; and Richard Legro, M.D., associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology, all Penn State College of Medicine, published their findings in "Oral Contraceptive Use by Teenage Women Does Not Affect Peak Bone Mass: A Longitudinal Study," is published in the October issue of the journal Fertility and Sterility.

Their work was sponsored by the National Institutes of Health through its support of the General Clinical Research Center at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Penn State. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Penn State. "Oral Contraceptive Use Does Not Affect Bone Mass." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 November 2000. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/11/001129075622.htm>.
Penn State. (2000, November 29). Oral Contraceptive Use Does Not Affect Bone Mass. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/11/001129075622.htm
Penn State. "Oral Contraceptive Use Does Not Affect Bone Mass." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/11/001129075622.htm (accessed October 31, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, October 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Melafind: Spotting Melanoma Without a Biopsy

Melafind: Spotting Melanoma Without a Biopsy

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) The MelaFind device is a pain-free way to check suspicious moles for melanoma, without the need for a biopsy. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Battling Multiple Myeloma

Battling Multiple Myeloma

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) The answer isn’t always found in new drugs – repurposing an ‘old’ drug that could mean better multiple myeloma treatment, and hope. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer

Chronic Inflammation and Prostate Cancer

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) New information that is linking chronic inflammation in the prostate and prostate cancer, which may help doctors and patients prevent cancer in the future. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sickle Cell: Stopping Kids’ Silent Strokes

Sickle Cell: Stopping Kids’ Silent Strokes

Ivanhoe (Oct. 31, 2014) Blood transfusions are proving crucial to young sickle cell patients by helping prevent strokes, even when there is no outward sign of brain injury. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins