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Unique Bandage Developed In Israel Saving The Lives Of Terror And Accident Victims

Date:
January 1, 2001
Source:
Ben-Gurion University Of The Negev
Summary:
Victims of severe automobile accidents, battle wounds, or terrorist bombs may have an increased margin of survival, thanks to a unique pressure dressing to stop bleeding, developed by a researcher at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev.

Beer-Sheva, December 28, 2000 - Victims of severe automobile accidents, battle wounds, or terrorist bombs may have an increased margin of survival, thanks to a unique pressure dressing to stop bleeding, developed by a researcher at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev.

The new dressing, enables the emergency worker to apply high pressure over the wound, stopping bleeding without the use of a painful tourniquet, which can itself sometimes cause tissue damage. The new bandage can also be used for wounds on the head, face, shoulder, armpit, and even the neck, parts of the body where bleeding is difficult to control.

The new bandage was developed by Dr. Sody A. Naimer, Department of Family Medicine at BGU's Faculty of Health Sciences. A report on this development appears in the November 2000 issue of the American Journal of Emergency Medicine. As claimed in its patent application, the ELastic Adhesive Dressing, known as ELAD, is an augmented approach for halting the bleeding of severe wounds.

Development of this new dressing, says Dr. Naimer, is the result of his emergency field work dealing with multiple trauma victims in the Gush Katif Local Council region, where he lives and works as a family doctor.

"Our new dressing," Naimer says, "is a sophisticated elaboration of simple concepts. It combines, for the first time, two formerly unrelated bandaging approaches, a standard military bandage and an adhesive, elastic bandage similar to an Ace(r) bandage commonly used for treating sprains. The contact pad is first placed over the bleeding wound and then the elastic bandage is repeatedly wound around the area to apply pressure. When the bandage is in place, bleeding is quickly stopped, freeing the paramedic or doctor for other lifesaving activities. Because of the self-adhesive, which sticks only the bandage material and not to skin, there is no discomfort in removing the dressing."

Naimer has already trained three teams in the use of his new bandage - the emergency workers in Gush Katif, a unit of Israel Defense Forces medics, and a group of ambulance drivers. The new bandages are prepared by the emergency workers themselves and carried along with the rest of their medical equipment.

Naimer and co-workers are now involved in further perfecting the dressing components to achieve even more effective hemorrhage control. He is carrying out the first-ever studies that measure under controlled laboratory conditions the pressure produced by various bandaging materials on different parts of the body.

"Our limited experience on trauma victims in the field and our controlled bandage-pressure studies using the ELAD," says Naimer, "are extremely encouraging. We are looking for an appropriate manufacturer to prepare the dressing in larger quantities, which will enable greater numbers of trauma victims to benefit from improved emergency-team care."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Ben-Gurion University Of The Negev. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Ben-Gurion University Of The Negev. "Unique Bandage Developed In Israel Saving The Lives Of Terror And Accident Victims." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 January 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/01/010101103009.htm>.
Ben-Gurion University Of The Negev. (2001, January 1). Unique Bandage Developed In Israel Saving The Lives Of Terror And Accident Victims. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/01/010101103009.htm
Ben-Gurion University Of The Negev. "Unique Bandage Developed In Israel Saving The Lives Of Terror And Accident Victims." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/01/010101103009.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

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