Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Listening To Music Of Choice During Outpatient Eye Surgery Lowers Patients' Cardiovascular, Emotional Stress

Date:
May 29, 2001
Source:
University At Buffalo
Summary:
Older adults who listened to their choice of music during outpatient eye surgery had significantly lower heart rate, blood pressure and cardiac work load than patients who did not listen to music, a study by researchers at the University at Buffalo has shown.

BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Older adults who listened to their choice of music during outpatient eye surgery had significantly lower heart rate, blood pressure and cardiac work load than patients who did not listen to music, a study by researchers at the University at Buffalo has shown.

Related Articles


Furthermore, the music-listeners rated themselves significantly less anxious and significantly better at coping with the experience than their non-music-listening colleagues.

Results of the study, previously presented at a meeting of the American Psychosomatic Society, appear in the current issue of Psychosomatic Medicine.

Karen Allen, Ph.D., research scientist in the UB Department of Medicine and lead author on the study, said music was responsible for two effects, both important to successful surgery: It decreased stress on the cardiovascular system and helped patients relax.

"If this were a drug intervention, people would be clamoring for it," said Allen, a pioneer researcher on the effect of music on cardiovascular response to stress. "Patients like it, it's cheap and effective, and has no negative side effects. Hospitals could offer it and be heroes to their patients."

Forty cataract or glaucoma patients ranging in age from 51-88 took part in the study. They were divided into two groups, each composed of 15 women and five men. Two participating surgeons treated half of each group.

Patients in the experimental group listened to music of their choice through headphones before, during and after surgery. Patients in the control group did not listen to music at any time.

Allen and colleagues measured blood pressure and heart rate in all patients one week before their surgery date, on the morning of surgery, and every five minutes during the preoperative, surgery and postoperative periods. An electrocardiogram was taken before and after each period as well.

Heart rate and blood pressure of all patients shot up the morning of surgery, Allen said, indicating that ambulatory surgery may be more stressful in this population than commonly believed. These measures of cardiovascular stress dropped significantly in the music group within 10 minutes of tuning in and remained low, results showed. Only in the music group did cardiovascular measures nearly reach baseline, Allen said.

Music patients also rated the stress of surgery lower and their ability to cope higher than the control group.

"This kind of surgery is much more stressful for elderly people than we thought," Allen said. "For them, ambulatory surgery is not a trivial matter. These were relatively well elderly and they weren't in any danger, but that is not a reason not to alleviate their stress."

Allen said the research shows music could be beneficial for relieving stress surrounding any type of ambulatory surgery.

Other investigators on the study were Lawrence Golden, M.D.; Alan Forrest, Pharm.D.; Charles Niles, M.D.; Philip Niswander, M.D.; Jared Barlow, M.D., and Joseph L. Izzo, Jr., M.D., all of UB, and M.I. Ching, M.D., research fellow at Millard Fillmore Hospital of Kaleida Health.

Music for the study was provided by Digital Music Express.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University At Buffalo. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University At Buffalo. "Listening To Music Of Choice During Outpatient Eye Surgery Lowers Patients' Cardiovascular, Emotional Stress." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 May 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/05/010529070645.htm>.
University At Buffalo. (2001, May 29). Listening To Music Of Choice During Outpatient Eye Surgery Lowers Patients' Cardiovascular, Emotional Stress. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/05/010529070645.htm
University At Buffalo. "Listening To Music Of Choice During Outpatient Eye Surgery Lowers Patients' Cardiovascular, Emotional Stress." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/05/010529070645.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Academic Scandal Shocks UNC

Academic Scandal Shocks UNC

AP (Oct. 23, 2014) A scandal involving bogus classes and inflated grades at the University of North Carolina was bigger than previously reported, a new investigation found. (Oct. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Working Mother Getaway: Beaches Turks & Caicos

Working Mother Getaway: Beaches Turks & Caicos

Working Mother (Oct. 22, 2014) Feast your eyes on this gorgeous family-friendly resort. Video provided by Working Mother
Powered by NewsLook.com
What Your Favorite Color Says About You

What Your Favorite Color Says About You

Buzz60 (Oct. 22, 2014) We all have one color we love to wear, and believe it or not, your color preference may reveal some of your character traits. In celebration of National Color Day, Krystin Goodwin (@kyrstingoodwin) highlights what your favorite colors may say about you. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) A medical team has for the first time given a man the ability to walk again after transplanting cells from his brain onto his severed spinal cord. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins