Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Soy Extract Reduces Prostate Cancer Growth In Mice, Cell Culture, UD Davis Study Finds

Date:
June 4, 2001
Source:
University Of California, Davis - Medical Center
Summary:
Studies performed by researchers at the UC Davis Cancer Center showed that genistein, a chemical found in soy, slowed prostate cancer growth in mice and caused prostate cancer cells to die.

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.) — Studies performed by researchers at the UC Davis Cancer Center showed that genistein, a chemical found in soy, slowed prostate cancer growth in mice and caused prostate cancer cells to die. Ralph deVere White, director of the UC Davis Cancer Center and chair of the Department of Urology at the UC Davis Medical Center, will present the results of these studies at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association in Anaheim on June 2-7.

Related Articles


Genistein is one of two compounds in soy that belong to a family of chemicals known as isoflavones. Isoflavones are phytoestrogens, plant-based chemicals that mimic the effects of estrogen in the body. Researchers theorize that the prevalence of soy in Asian diets may be one reason why men in Asia have a lower rate of prostate cancer than men in the United States.

For the UC Davis study, scientists tested a commercially made extract of genistein on mice bred to develop prostate cancer and on metastatic prostate cancer cell lines.

In mice, genistein reduced prostate cancer tumor growth. In tissue culture, genistein increased the production of p21, a gene that regulates cell growth, and it reduced the production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a protein that helps cancer grow. These factors caused cancer cells to die, a process known as apoptosis.

"We’ve identified the mechanisms by which genistein may work in prostate cancer, and it’s consistent with other studies of soy," said deVere White. "While we are encouraged by these results, we need to test genistein in patients with prostate cancer to be certain of its effectiveness."

UC Davis researchers are now evaluating the effects of genistein in men who have been diagnosed with slow-growing prostate cancer. The cancer center will ultimately enroll 70 men in the pilot study to see if genistein lowers levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA), a tumor marker for prostate cancer.

Men who have chosen not to receive treatment for prostate cancer or who have undergone treatment and whose PSA levels are rising slowly are eligible to participate in the trial. Volunteers, depending on their body weight, will take up to five grams of genistein daily for six months. Results will be known in a year.

It is unlikely genistein would become a stand-alone treatment for prostate cancer, said deVere White. "But we hope it could be used in conjunction with conventional therapy or as a preventive drug, if it indeed lowers PSA."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of California, Davis - Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of California, Davis - Medical Center. "Soy Extract Reduces Prostate Cancer Growth In Mice, Cell Culture, UD Davis Study Finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 June 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/06/010604072646.htm>.
University Of California, Davis - Medical Center. (2001, June 4). Soy Extract Reduces Prostate Cancer Growth In Mice, Cell Culture, UD Davis Study Finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/06/010604072646.htm
University Of California, Davis - Medical Center. "Soy Extract Reduces Prostate Cancer Growth In Mice, Cell Culture, UD Davis Study Finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/06/010604072646.htm (accessed November 22, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, November 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

AFP (Nov. 21, 2014) Having children has always been a frightening prospect in Sierra Leone, the world's most dangerous place to give birth, but Ebola has presented an alarming new threat for expectant mothers. Duration: 00:37 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) Researchers in Beijing discovered a gene called 5-HTA1, and carriers are reportedly 20 percent more likely to be single. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Paralyzed Marine Walks With Robotic Braces

Raw: Paralyzed Marine Walks With Robotic Braces

AP (Nov. 21, 2014) Marine Corps officials say a special operations officer left paralyzed by a sniper's bullet in Afghanistan walked using robotic leg braces in a ceremony to award him a Bronze Star. (Nov. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) Researchers find that as people approach new decades in their lives they make bigger life decisions. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins