Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Sea Of Galilee Yields Clues For Weather Forecasting

Date:
September 24, 2001
Source:
Texas A&M University
Summary:
Oceanographer Ayal Anis has studied the lake where Christ walked on the water, but rather than focusing on religious questions, his research aims to shed light on the process by which surface waves transfer energy from the air to the water.

GALVESTON, September 19 - Oceanographer Ayal Anis has studied the lake where Christ walked on the water, but rather than focusing on religious questions, his research aims to shed light on the process by which surface waves transfer energy from the air to the water.

Related Articles


Anis, a professor of marine science at Texas A&M University at Galveston, analyzed the physical response of the Sea of Galilee to external forcing. His study, initially funded by the U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation, indicated that the most intense mixing occurred closest to the lake's shores, not in its center and produced results that should be applicable to other bodies of water as well.

Continuing his research at TAMUG under a grant from the Office of Naval Research, Anis is seeking to extrapolate findings from his lake research to the oceans. His current research aims to shed light on the processes by which energy and momentum are transferred from the atmosphere to the ocean, with a specific emphasis on the role of surface waves in these processes.

"Waves at the surface of bodies of water, where air and water interface, are an important agent in the mixing of heat energy from air molecules into the water immediately below them," Anis said. "Momentum from the air molecules also transfers to the water molecules through the surface waves. An understanding of these processes proves crucial for constructing computer models that will be able to accurately predict currents and temperatures in the ocean, similar to what meteorologists are doing when forecasting the weather."

Working with Robert Miller, a professor at Oregon State University, Anis observed intense internal wave activity near the lake's shores (internal waves are similar to those observed on the water surface, but usually have much larger vertical amplitudes). Near the lake's center, which is farther away from the boundaries, much less activity was observed, with relatively little mixing and little internal wave motion.

A suite of numerical models, with an increasing level of complexity, was developed to predict thermal and velocity structure under various forcing scenarios. The performance of these models was then compared to an extensive data set collected in the lake during the study.

"If the air-water energy and momentum exchange at the boundary between the air and the ocean surface is not modeled correctly, ocean forecasts will be erroneous," Anis said. "Unfortunately, earlier models have mostly disregarded the impact of surface wave action on energy exchange, but we can't simply assume that the action of winds on the ocean has the same result as wind blowing over land.

"For example, weak surface waves may limit mixing to the upper meters of the ocean, while large surface waves and intense wave breaking may cause intense turbulence that can enhance mixing to greater depths," he observed. "Therefore, it is extremely important to get the energy mixing component of the model right. If our understanding of this part is wrong, the models we construct will produce unreliable predictions."

"In addition to providing accurate driving forces for models, understanding ocean mixing processes is also important to the study of other oceanic issues such as fishes. For example, turbulence and mixing processes may have a pronounced effect on the development of juvenile fish through predator-prey interactions: when turbulence is intense we may expect a higher success rate for the predator to encounter prey."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Texas A&M University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Texas A&M University. "Sea Of Galilee Yields Clues For Weather Forecasting." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 September 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/09/010920071932.htm>.
Texas A&M University. (2001, September 24). Sea Of Galilee Yields Clues For Weather Forecasting. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/09/010920071932.htm
Texas A&M University. "Sea Of Galilee Yields Clues For Weather Forecasting." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/09/010920071932.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Friday, October 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

3D Printed Instruments Make Sweet Music in Sweden

3D Printed Instruments Make Sweet Music in Sweden

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 23, 2014) Students from Lund University's Malmo Academy of Music are believed to be the world's first band to all use 3D printed instruments. The guitar, bass guitar, keyboard and drums were built by Olaf Diegel, professor of product development, who says 3D printing allows musicians to design an instrument to their exact specifications. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chameleon Camouflage to Give Tanks Cloaking Capabilities

Chameleon Camouflage to Give Tanks Cloaking Capabilities

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 22, 2014) Inspired by the way a chameleon changes its colour to disguise itself; scientists in Poland want to replace traditional camouflage paint with thousands of electrochromic plates that will continuously change colour to blend with its surroundings. The first PL-01 concept tank prototype will be tested within a few years, with scientists predicting that a similar technology could even be woven into the fabric of a soldiers' clothing making them virtually invisible to the naked eye. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jet Sales Lift Boeing Profit 18 Pct.

Jet Sales Lift Boeing Profit 18 Pct.

Reuters - Business Video Online (Oct. 22, 2014) Strong jet demand has pushed Boeing to raise its profit forecast for the third time, but analysts were disappointed by its small cash flow. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Internet of Things Aims to Smarten Your Life

Internet of Things Aims to Smarten Your Life

AP (Oct. 22, 2014) As more and more Bluetooth-enabled devices are reaching consumers, developers are busy connecting them together as part of the Internet of Things. (Oct. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins