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NASA Technology Melts Ice, Keeping Transit System Safe

Date:
December 19, 2001
Source:
NASA/Ames Research Center
Summary:
A NASA-developed, environmentally friendly anti-icing fluid that can make railroad and commuter travel safer and more reliable during snowy conditions is now available for commercial applications.

A NASA-developed, environmentally friendly anti-icing fluid that can make railroad and commuter travel safer and more reliable during snowy conditions is now available for commercial applications.

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Under license from NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., Midwest Industrial Supply, Inc. of Canton, Ohio, has produced several commercial products that prevent the build-up of ice and snow on railways, providing a smooth ride for passengers and helping to eliminate transit system delays and shutdowns due to weather conditions.

"This anti-icing fluid, if applied before freezing conditions are encountered, will prevent ice from forming," explained Dr. John Zuk of Ames, one of the developers of the technology. "The fluid also can be applied to an already-frozen surface to melt the snow and ice."

The environmentally friendly anti-icing fluid originally was developed by NASA Ames researchers in the 1990s to replace highly toxic and non-biodegradable anti-icing fluids used in the aerospace industry. "Current aircraft anti-icing fluids are not environmentally friendly," Zuk said. "Ames' development, however, is an essentially non-toxic, totally biodegradable and non-corrosive material that improves travel conditions without polluting the environment."

"This remarkable material derived from the space program can significantly enhance products for railroad operations," said Robert Vitale, president of Midwest Industrial Supply, Inc. (MIS). "Now, MIS is ready to offer several products that use NASA's fluid technology to free the railways and transit systems of ice and snow."

The fluid can be pressure-sprayed, applied with a brush or poured, depending on the application. When a small amount of the fluid is sprayed on the surface to be protected, a very thin fluid film is formed. If applied before freezing conditions are encountered, the fluid will prevent rain or dew from freezing on the object and will melt fallen snow upon contact.

It also can be applied to melt pre-existing snow and ice, and it prevents refreezing of the object. One of the unique characteristics of the fluid is its strong resistance to the effects of gravity, which prevents removal of the protective coat by rain, snow, wind or gravity-induced run-off.

"We have all been impressed with the results, and now the company is looking to expand the application of NASA Ames' anti-icing fluid to other industries that face similar problems," said Vitale.

The NASA Ames environmentally friendly anti-icing fluid may potentially be used on bridges, streets, runways, ships and boats, automobiles and even around homes, for sidewalks and roofs. "Because the fluid is neither an acid nor a base, it will not corrode steel and reinforced concrete, so roadways and bridges can be safely treated with the fluid," said Zuk. "Similarly, vehicles will avoid the body-corrosion typically associated with the use of road salt," he added.

"NASA's commercial technology charter is to transfer new technology developments to industry for commercial use," said Cathy Pochel, technology commercialization manager in Ames' Commercial Technology Office. "This project is not only an outstanding example of this objective, but directly benefits the public as well."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NASA/Ames Research Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

NASA/Ames Research Center. "NASA Technology Melts Ice, Keeping Transit System Safe." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 December 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/12/011218073836.htm>.
NASA/Ames Research Center. (2001, December 19). NASA Technology Melts Ice, Keeping Transit System Safe. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/12/011218073836.htm
NASA/Ames Research Center. "NASA Technology Melts Ice, Keeping Transit System Safe." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/12/011218073836.htm (accessed February 28, 2015).

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