Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

PET Tracer Detects Early Prostate Cancer

Date:
February 18, 2002
Source:
Society Of Nuclear Medicine
Summary:
A new test may help doctors more accurately diagnose prostate cancer in the early stages of disease. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men, and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men over 40 in the United States. Detecting prostate cancer before it spreads is a key challenge facing physicians—and can have a major impact on patient survival.

A new test may help doctors more accurately diagnose prostate cancer in the early stages of disease. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men, and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men over 40 in the United States. Detecting prostate cancer before it spreads is a key challenge facing physicians—and can have a major impact on patient survival.

In research undertaken in Japan by Dr. Nobuyuki Oyama, MD, PhD, 18 patients with prostate cancer confirmed by biopsy underwent positron emission tomography (PET) scanning using two different radiotracers: 18F-FDG and 11C-acetate. Of those, 100% of 11C-acetate PET scans were positive for primary prostate cancer, while only 83% of 18F-FDG PET scans were positive. 11C-Acetate not only showed significantly greater sensitivity for prostate cancer, it was also better able to detect distant metastases. The researchers concluded that 11C-acetate PET imaging may be able to detect prostate cancers that are currently undetectable by 18F-FDG PET.

PET scans using various tracer elements have been increasingly recognized as a vital tool in the diagnosis of many cancers, including melanoma, lymphoma, and lung, colorectal, and breast cancer. Patients undergoing PET scans are injected with the tracer element, which is then taken up by the body tissues. Areas of higher metabolic activity, such as cancer cells, tend to absorb more of the tracer element, enabling physicians to distinguish between normal and cancerous cells. Thus PET can often detect a tumor before it becomes visible by conventional CT or MRI, which primarily image anatomical changes. PET can also be used to evaluate whether a treatment is working.

Unfortunately, 18F-FDG PET has not proven effective in detecting early prostate cancer. This is because the 18F-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose) tracer is not taken up well by prostate tumors, which often have a slower glucose metabolism. 11C-Acetate also responds to metabolic activity, but how or why it has higher uptake within prostate tumors is not completely clear.

###

Reference:

11-C-Acetate PET Imaging of Prostate Cancer was written by Nobuyuki Oyama, MD, PhD, Hironobu Akino, MD, PhD, Hiroshi Kanamaru, MD, PhD, Yuji Suzuki, MD, PhD, Satoshi all of the Department of Urology, Fukui Medical University, Fukui, Japan, Satoshi Muramoto, MD, Department of Radiology, Fukui Medical University, Yoshiharu Yonekura, MD, PhD, Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Fukui Medical University, Norihiro Sadato, MD, PhD, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki, Japan, Kazutaka Yamamoto, MD PhD, Wakasa Energy Research Center, Fukui, Japan and Kenichiro Okada, MD PhD, Department of Urology, Fukui Medical University, Fukui, Japan.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Society Of Nuclear Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Society Of Nuclear Medicine. "PET Tracer Detects Early Prostate Cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 February 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/02/020215070305.htm>.
Society Of Nuclear Medicine. (2002, February 18). PET Tracer Detects Early Prostate Cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/02/020215070305.htm
Society Of Nuclear Medicine. "PET Tracer Detects Early Prostate Cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/02/020215070305.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The Wawona Packing Company has issued a voluntary recall on the stone fruit it distributes due to a possible Listeria outbreak. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The 83 new genetic markers could open dozens of new avenues for schizophrenia treatment research. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Head Concerned About a Post-Antibiotic Era

CDC Head Concerned About a Post-Antibiotic Era

AP (July 22, 2014) Sounding alarms about the growing threat of antibiotic resistance, CDC Director Tom Frieden warned Tuesday if the global community does not confront the problem soon, the world will be living in a devastating post-antibiotic era. (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

AP (July 22, 2014) Two federal appeals courts issued conflicting rulings Tuesday on the legality of the federally-run healthcare exchange that operates in 36 states. (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins