Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Mechanical Engineer Developing Nanotech Control Device For Possible Use In Telesurgery

Date:
April 29, 2002
Source:
Texas A&M University
Summary:
In the science of the small, precision and accuracy really count. Won-jong Kim, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Texas A&M University, is developing a device that can be used to precisely position objects in nanotechnology and even telesurgery.

In the science of the small, precision and accuracy really count.

Related Articles


Won-jong Kim, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Texas A&M University, is developing a device that can be used to precisely position objects in nanotechnology and even telesurgery.

Nanotechnology is the building of things one atom at a time with miniaturized robotics. Positioning devices, such as the one Kim is developing, are used in nanotechnology to move an object being studied or worked on into the precise position needed for study.

In telesurgery, for example, a surgeon a few feet or hundreds of miles away could use one of these devices to precisely position the robot performing the surgery.

Kim's device achieves six degrees of freedom. That is, it moves on three axes - forward and backward, left and right, up and down - and in a circle around each of those axes, unlike conventional positioning devices that move in a straight line or in a circle on only one axis. Six conventional devices have to be stacked together to achieve the range of motion of Kim's single device.

The device uses powerful magnets to hold itself together. The parts don't touch but are rather held in place by magnetic force, eliminating the friction that makes nanoscale positioning so difficult.

"Compared with conventional technology, the main advantage of this technology is that it eliminates mechanical contact and friction," Kim said. "It also improves accuracy and resolution, decreases manufacturing costs and increases reliability."

Kim's research is supported by a Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF).


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Texas A&M University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Texas A&M University. "Mechanical Engineer Developing Nanotech Control Device For Possible Use In Telesurgery." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 April 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/04/020429072233.htm>.
Texas A&M University. (2002, April 29). Mechanical Engineer Developing Nanotech Control Device For Possible Use In Telesurgery. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/04/020429072233.htm
Texas A&M University. "Mechanical Engineer Developing Nanotech Control Device For Possible Use In Telesurgery." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/04/020429072233.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Matter & Energy News

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

NASA's First 3-D Printer In Space Creates Its First Object

NASA's First 3-D Printer In Space Creates Its First Object

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) The International Space Station is now using a proof-of-concept 3D printer to test additive printing in a weightless, isolated environment. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Bolivian Recycling Initiative Turns Plastic Waste Into School Furniture

Bolivian Recycling Initiative Turns Plastic Waste Into School Furniture

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) Innovative recycling project in La Paz separates city waste and converts plastic garbage into school furniture made from 'plastiwood'. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Blu-Ray Discs Getting Second Run As Solar Panels

Blu-Ray Discs Getting Second Run As Solar Panels

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) Researchers at Northwestern University are repurposing Blu-ray movies for better solar panel technology thanks to the discs' internal structures. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins