Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Flexible Joints Associated With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Researchers Find

Date:
September 6, 2002
Source:
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Summary:
Researchers at Johns Hopkins Children's Center report that children and teens with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) are three and a half times more likely to have hyperflexible joints than their healthy counterparts.

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Children's Center report that children and teens with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) are three and a half times more likely to have hyperflexible joints than their healthy counterparts.

The findings, reported in the September issue of The Journal of Pediatrics, contradict widely shared clinical observations that people with CFS have normal physical examinations. CFS is an often disabling constellation of fatigue- and pain-related symptoms that can interfere with daily life and cause long absences from school.

"This study suggests either that hypermobility itself is an important factor in the development of CFS, or it is associated with another factor that predisposes a person to CFS," says lead researcher Peter C. Rowe, M.D., professor of pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center.

Rowe cautions that joint hypermobility alone is not a direct cause of CFS. "We know that about 20 percent of healthy adolescents have joint hypermobility, but clearly most do not go on to develop CFS, so simply finding this on an exam need not start a search for CFS," Rowe says.

Researchers examined 116 children, ages 10 and older, for joint hypermobility. The test group was split evenly between patients diagnosed with CFS and otherwise healthy children. Joint hypermobility was graded on the degree to which a patient could bend the pinkie finger back beyond 90 degrees; bend the thumb to touch the forearm; hyperextend the knee beyond 190 degrees; hyperextend the elbow beyond 190 degrees; and place the palms flat on the floor without bending the legs. Sixty percent of those with CFS showed joint hypermobility, compared with 24 percent of the healthy children.

The link between flexible joints and CFS may provide further insight into the development of CFS symptoms, because an individual's degree of joint mobility is apparent in early childhood, long before the onset of CFS symptoms, Rowe says.

Children with CFS often have orthostatic intolerance, a condition associated with excessive pooling of blood that results in heart and blood pressure problems, headaches, dizziness and other symptoms. Rowe and colleagues had previously reported that patients with orthostatic intolerance also have Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, a connective tissue disorder characterized by joint hypermobility.

Researchers from the departments of Pediatrics and Dermatology, and the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, contributed to the study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. "Flexible Joints Associated With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Researchers Find." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 September 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/09/020906065021.htm>.
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. (2002, September 6). Flexible Joints Associated With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Researchers Find. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/09/020906065021.htm
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. "Flexible Joints Associated With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Researchers Find." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/09/020906065021.htm (accessed August 21, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Cadavers, a Teen, and a Medical School Dream

Cadavers, a Teen, and a Medical School Dream

AP (Aug. 21, 2014) Contains graphic content. He's only 17. But Johntrell Bowles has wanted to be a doctor from a young age, despite the odds against him. He was recently the youngest participant in a cadaver program at the Indiana University NW medical school. (Aug. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Possible Ebola Patient in Isolation at California Hospital

Possible Ebola Patient in Isolation at California Hospital

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 20, 2014) A patient who may have been exposed to the Ebola virus is in isolation at the Kaiser Permanente South Sacramento Medical Center. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Reasons Why Teen Birth Rates Are At An All-Time Low

Reasons Why Teen Birth Rates Are At An All-Time Low

Newsy (Aug. 20, 2014) A CDC report says birth rates among teenagers have been declining for decades, reaching a new low in 2013. We look at several popular explanations. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Common Antibiotic Could Lead To Heart-Related Death

Common Antibiotic Could Lead To Heart-Related Death

Newsy (Aug. 20, 2014) Danish researchers discovered patients taking clarithromycin have an increased risk of dying from a heart-related issue. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins