Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Scientists Trap Hydrogen Gas In Ice "Cages" -- Implications For Fuel Cells And Space Science

Date:
September 30, 2002
Source:
Carnegie Institution
Summary:
Until recently, scientists thought that molecular hydrogen (H2) was too small to be contained in clathrate hydrates - crystalline solids where a framework of water molecules enclose molecules of gas. Now, researchers at the Carnegie Institution of Washington's Geophysical Laboratory, University of Chicago, and Los Alamos National Laboratory, have been able to trap the gas inside water-ice structures forming hydrogen hydrate.

Until recently, scientists thought that molecular hydrogen (H2) was too small to be contained in clathrate hydrates - crystalline solids where a framework of water molecules enclose molecules of gas. Now, researchers at the Carnegie Institution of Washington's Geophysical Laboratory, University of Chicago, and Los Alamos National Laboratory, have been able to trap the gas inside water-ice structures forming hydrogen hydrate.

According to team member Ho-kwang (Dave) Mao, "This result could be a first step toward an alternative way of storing environmentally friendly hydrogen gas. It also points to the possibility that hydrogen might exist in icy bodies in our solar system that we thought were incapable of retaining it." The scientists report their findings in the September 27, 2002, issue of Science. Hydrogen is the most abundant gas in the universe and the race has been on to find a cost-efficient, practical way to store it for fuel use. Using a diamond-anvil cell, the researchers subjected a mixture of hydrogen and water to a pressure equivalent to about 2,000 times the atmospheric pressure at sea level (220 megapascals) at room temperature (300 K or 80°F). Two regions formed --an H2 bubble and liquid water. When the mixture was cooled to minus 11°F (249 K) the two regions reacted and formed one solid compound.

Unlike most clathrate hydrates, where only one molecule of a gas can be trapped in each of the H2O cages, multiple hydrogen molecules were entrapped in this material--two molecules in small cages and four in larger ones. The synthesized material "showed remarkable stability," persisting when warmed to about 45°F (280K). Upon cooling to liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K, -321°F) and releasing pressure completely, the clathrate remained.

"Many microorganisms that appear to be ancient 'breathe' hydrogen," says Wesley Huntress, director of Carnegie's Geophysical Lab and former NASA Associate Administrator for Space Science. "The ability of water to trap hydrogen may also be significant for biology on the early Earth, providing a potential mechanism to supply this gas to the atmosphere at a time when life was just beginning on this planet. "

###Researchers on this project include the following: Wendy Mao, Univ. of Chicago and Carnegie Institution of Washington; Ho-kwang Mao, Alexander Goncharov, Viktor Struzhkin, Quanzhong Guo, Jingzhu Hu, Jinfu Shu, and Russell Hemley, Carnegie Institution of Washington; Maddury Somayazulu, HPCAT Advanced Photon Source, Argonne Nat'l Lab; Yusheng Zhao, Los Alamos Nat'l Lab.

The Carnegie Institution of Washington (http://www.CarnegieInstitution.org) has been a pioneering force in basic scientific research since 1902. It is a private, nonprofit organization with six research departments in the U.S.: Plant Biology, Global Ecology, The Observatories, Embryology, the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, and the Geophysical Laboratory.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Carnegie Institution. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Carnegie Institution. "Scientists Trap Hydrogen Gas In Ice "Cages" -- Implications For Fuel Cells And Space Science." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 September 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/09/020927070631.htm>.
Carnegie Institution. (2002, September 30). Scientists Trap Hydrogen Gas In Ice "Cages" -- Implications For Fuel Cells And Space Science. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/09/020927070631.htm
Carnegie Institution. "Scientists Trap Hydrogen Gas In Ice "Cages" -- Implications For Fuel Cells And Space Science." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/09/020927070631.htm (accessed October 23, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

3D Printed Instruments Make Sweet Music in Sweden

3D Printed Instruments Make Sweet Music in Sweden

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 23, 2014) — Students from Lund University's Malmo Academy of Music are believed to be the world's first band to all use 3D printed instruments. The guitar, bass guitar, keyboard and drums were built by Olaf Diegel, professor of product development, who says 3D printing allows musicians to design an instrument to their exact specifications. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chameleon Camouflage to Give Tanks Cloaking Capabilities

Chameleon Camouflage to Give Tanks Cloaking Capabilities

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 22, 2014) — Inspired by the way a chameleon changes its colour to disguise itself; scientists in Poland want to replace traditional camouflage paint with thousands of electrochromic plates that will continuously change colour to blend with its surroundings. The first PL-01 concept tank prototype will be tested within a few years, with scientists predicting that a similar technology could even be woven into the fabric of a soldiers' clothing making them virtually invisible to the naked eye. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jet Sales Lift Boeing Profit 18 Pct.

Jet Sales Lift Boeing Profit 18 Pct.

Reuters - Business Video Online (Oct. 22, 2014) — Strong jet demand has pushed Boeing to raise its profit forecast for the third time, but analysts were disappointed by its small cash flow. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Internet of Things Aims to Smarten Your Life

Internet of Things Aims to Smarten Your Life

AP (Oct. 22, 2014) — As more and more Bluetooth-enabled devices are reaching consumers, developers are busy connecting them together as part of the Internet of Things. (Oct. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins