Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Permanent Birth Control Option For Women Offers Less-invasive Alternative To Tubal Ligation

Date:
April 21, 2003
Source:
University of Maryland Medical Center
Summary:
Couples looking for permanent contraception now have a new option other than tubal ligation or vasectomy. Doctors at the University of Maryland Medical Center are among the first in the area to offer Essure, a non-surgical procedure for women that involves placing small coils in the fallopian tubes.

Couples looking for permanent contraception now have a new option other than tubal ligation or vasectomy. Doctors at the University of Maryland Medical Center are among the first in the area to offer Essure, a non-surgical procedure for women that involves placing small coils in the fallopian tubes. Over time, scar tissue develops around these coils, which blocks the fallopian tubes and prevents conception.

"This procedure will revolutionize permanent birth control because it is less invasive than tubal ligation or vasectomy," says Richard Marvel, M.D., a gynecologist at the University of Maryland Medical Center and an assistant professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. "What's so exciting about this procedure is that you don't need to make any incision. After the procedure, patients can go home or even go back to work."

While a tubal ligation requires general anesthesia, the Essure procedure is done with local anesthetic. During the procedure, doctors use a thin, telescope-type instrument called a hysteroscope and insert it through the cervix to reach the fallopian tubes. A camera on the end of the scope allows them to see into the uterus. Doctors place a small, soft coil in the fallopian tube, where it expands and fills the tube. Doctors then move to the other side to place another coil in the other tube. The entire procedure takes less than 30 minutes.

While the procedure itself is quick, it takes longer for the scar tissue to develop and permanently block the tubes. Women must use another form of contraception for at least three months. They also need to return 12 weeks after the procedure to have a special x-ray to confirm that the tubes are closed.

"Studies of the procedure have found that at three months, 96 percent of the women's tubes were closed and 100 percent were closed at six months," explains Dr. Marvel. In clinical trials involving more than 600 women, there were no pregnancies following the procedure. As with other birth control methods, the Essure system is not expected to be 100 percent effective; however the manufacturer cites a 99.8 percent effectiveness rate in two years of follow up.

Tubal ligation remains the most popular form of contraception in the United States with an estimated 700,000 procedures every year. The procedure involves cutting, sealing, or placing bands or clips around the fallopian tubes. Each operation requires cutting into the abdomen and a four to six day recovery period. Even laproscopic surgery with just small incisions carries a small risk of damage to the bowel, bladder, blood vessels and nerves. Many women express concerns about tubal ligation because of the anesthesia, the incision and recovery time.

The new Essure method, which received FDA approval in November 2002, provides a less-invasive alternative for these women: there's no incision and it will eventually be performed in a doctor's office. Costs will likely be the same as a tubal ligation, and most insurance companies will cover the procedure as they do with other sterilization procedures for both women and men.

For couples considering vasectomy as a form of permanent birth control, Essure may be considered a less-invasive alternative because it does not require an incision. More than 400,000 men have a vasectomy each year in the United States. During a vasectomy, doctors clamp, cut or seal off each vas deferens tube (the tube through which sperm passes) in order to prevent the release of sperm.

Women who choose the Essure system must understand that it is irreversible, so they need to be certain in their decision to have permanent contraception. Essure does not protect against HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. It will not affect menstruation or menopause.

"I honestly think Essure will revolutionize permanent contraception for women," says Dr. Marvel. "This is a procedure that can be done in an office setting in under 30 minutes using local anesthesia without an incision."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Maryland Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Maryland Medical Center. "New Permanent Birth Control Option For Women Offers Less-invasive Alternative To Tubal Ligation." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 April 2003. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/04/030421083818.htm>.
University of Maryland Medical Center. (2003, April 21). New Permanent Birth Control Option For Women Offers Less-invasive Alternative To Tubal Ligation. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/04/030421083818.htm
University of Maryland Medical Center. "New Permanent Birth Control Option For Women Offers Less-invasive Alternative To Tubal Ligation." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/04/030421083818.htm (accessed July 22, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

AP (July 22, 2014) Two federal appeals courts issued conflicting rulings Tuesday on the legality of the federally-run healthcare exchange that operates in 36 states. (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The new sci-fi thriller "Lucy" is making people question whether we really use all our brainpower. But, as scientists have insisted for years, we do. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Newsy (July 22, 2014) Boston scientists have discovered a new way to create fully functioning human platelets using a bioreactor and human stem cells. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

TheStreet (July 21, 2014) New research shows Gilead Science's drug Sovaldi helps in curing hepatitis C in those who suffer from HIV. In a medical study, the combination of Gilead's Hep C drug with anti-viral drug Ribavirin cured 76% of HIV-positive patients suffering from the most common hepatitis C strain. Hepatitis C and related complications have been a top cause of death in HIV-positive patients. Typical medication used to treat the disease, including interferon proteins, tended to react badly with HIV drugs. However, Sovaldi's %1,000-a-pill price tag could limit the number of patients able to access the treatment. TheStreet's Keris Lahiff reports from New York. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins