Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Genetic Risks For Disease Often Missing From Patient Charts

Date:
August 13, 2003
Source:
Northwestern University
Summary:
Standard history-taking in internal medicine practices may not fully capture patients' risks for developing certain diseases and internists may lose opportunities to provide preventive medical recommendations, according to a study from Northwestern University.

Standard history-taking in internal medicine practices may not fully capture patients' risks for developing certain diseases and internists may lose opportunities to provide preventive medical recommendations, according to a study from Northwestern University.

Related Articles


Researchers on the study included Theresa M. Frezzo; Wendy S. Rubinstein, M.D.; Daniel Dunham, M.D.; and Kelly E. Ormond of the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University.

Results from the study showed that about 80 percent of patients in an internal medicine practice were at moderate or high risk for certain adult-onset conditions with known genetic components -- such as breast/ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, colon cancer, heart disease, non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and conditions causing blood clotting or stroke.

Using an oral "pedigree" or written questionnaire, the researchers identified twice as many individuals at increased risk than was documented in patient charts. The pedigree is a medical diagram of a family tree used to help make diagnosis of genetic disease, determine risk for developing genetic disease or determine risk for having a child with a genetic disease.

The study, which was published in a recent issue of Genetics in Medicine, was based on an analysis of data -- in either a family history questionnaire or in a three-generation pedigree interview conducted by a genetic counselor -- compared with information recorded on patient charts. Three-generation pedigrees include health information on parents and siblings, aunts and uncles and cousins and grandparents.

Since a family history of adult-onset disease is one of the largest risk factors for developing a condition in adulthood, knowing a patient's family history, and, therefore, the patient's risk, may influence decisions about potential genetic testing, as well as treatments or lifestyle changes that may significantly reduce the occurrence of premature illness and death.

Yet, limited training in genetics and brief patient visits curb most physicians' routine use of a comprehensive three-generation pedigree, Frezzo and colleagues said.

"Recording the medical family history should be a component of any preventive healthcare risk assessment. As genetic risk factors are better understood and more interventions to reduce risk become available, evaluation of the genetic family history may become an integral part of public and preventive medicine," the researchers said.

They believe that more research and education on the benefits of using family history questionnaires and three-generation pedigrees will expedite incorporation of these tools into primary medicine, resulting in improved prevention, diagnostic and treatment strategies.

Frezzo is the research coordinator and a genetic counselor for the NUgene Project at the Center for Genetic Medicine at the Feinberg School. Ormond is assistant professor of medicine, director of the Graduate Program in Genetic Counseling, and a member of the Center for Genetic Medicine at the Feinberg School. Rubinstein is assistant professor of medicine at the Feinberg School and a researcher in the Center for Medical Genetics at Evanston Northwestern Healthcare. Dunham is assistant professor of medicine at the Feinberg School and a general internist at the Northwestern Medical Faculty Foundation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Northwestern University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Northwestern University. "Genetic Risks For Disease Often Missing From Patient Charts." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 August 2003. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/08/030813071209.htm>.
Northwestern University. (2003, August 13). Genetic Risks For Disease Often Missing From Patient Charts. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/08/030813071209.htm
Northwestern University. "Genetic Risks For Disease Often Missing From Patient Charts." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/08/030813071209.htm (accessed February 28, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, February 28, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Feb. 27, 2015) A dongle that plugs into a Smartphone mimics a lab-based blood test for HIV and syphilis and can detect the diseases in 15 minutes, say researchers. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) An Italian doctor is saying he could stick someone&apos;s head onto someone else&apos;s body. Patrick Jones (@Patrick_E_Jones) reports. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

Newsy (Feb. 27, 2015) A new study from researchers at New York University suggests dentists could soon use blood samples taken from patients&apos; mouths to test for diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Tips to Makeover Your Health

The Best Tips to Makeover Your Health

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) If you&apos;re looking to boost your health this season, there are a few quick and easy steps to prompt you for success. Krystin Goodwin (@Krystingoodwin) has the best tips to give your health a makeover this spring! Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins