Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Researchers Testing Way To Communicate To Soldiers On Battlefield Through Vibrations

Date:
January 8, 2004
Source:
University Of Central Florida
Summary:
University of Central Florida researchers are testing whether the military could alert soldiers to battlefield threats through vibrations and rely less on other, more distracting communications.

ORLANDO, Jan. 7, 2004 -- University of Central Florida researchers are testing whether the military could alert soldiers to battlefield threats through vibrations and rely less on other, more distracting communications. In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Defense's central research-and-development organization, UCF researchers are evaluating ways to send coded signals through miniature devices that vibrate. Their work could lead to a new method of communication for soldiers who rely on verbal messages and visual displays mounted in their helmets.

"Clearly, there's a concern for our soldiers, allied soldiers and civilians," said Richard Gilson, a psychology professor who is the lead researcher on the project. "We want to find out if there's a better way to convey information about threats. I seriously think we can save some lives with this."

Communicating with soldiers presents many challenges for the military. Soldiers must clearly understand information about threats, because miscommunications can leave them vulnerable to attacks and wrong responses can be deadly.

Gilson said the military can best convey information without lights and sounds that could alert the enemy to soldiers' locations. Helmet-mounted displays block some of the soldiers' views of their surroundings. And soldiers can be so overwhelmed with visual and auditory information that they aren't paying enough attention to the sights and sounds around them, Gilson said.

The U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, provided $470,000 for the project in September. Initial research will test how well UCF students understand information relayed through vibrating sensors on their bodies compared with information they hear through speakers in the room.

The UCF researchers will focus on whether coded vibrations are a more effective way to relay information, not on specific details such as what type of device should be used to send them or where the sensors should be placed on the soldiers' bodies, Gilson said.

If the research shows communication through vibrations to be more effective, then the military would investigate how to best put it into practice. It's possible that the vibrations could be relayed through devices built into belts, inside helmets or even in mouthpieces, Gilson said. The new system could be used along with the current methods of communication.

Future phases of UCF's research could get more specific, as researchers would try to find out how much detail they could communicate through patterns of vibrations.

Psychology professors Mustapha Mouloua and Peter Hancock are helping Gilson with the research, as are post-doctoral fellows James Szalma and Tal Oron-Gilad. Graduate students Chris Brill, Joshua Downs, Cleve Mortimer and Peter Terrence also are helping to conduct the research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Central Florida. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Central Florida. "Researchers Testing Way To Communicate To Soldiers On Battlefield Through Vibrations." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 January 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/01/040108073318.htm>.
University Of Central Florida. (2004, January 8). Researchers Testing Way To Communicate To Soldiers On Battlefield Through Vibrations. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/01/040108073318.htm
University Of Central Florida. "Researchers Testing Way To Communicate To Soldiers On Battlefield Through Vibrations." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/01/040108073318.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Thanks, Marty McFly! Hoverboards Could Be Coming In 2015

Thanks, Marty McFly! Hoverboards Could Be Coming In 2015

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) If you've ever watched "Back to the Future Part II" and wanted to get your hands on a hoverboard, well, you might soon be in luck. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robots to Fly Planes Where Humans Can't

Robots to Fly Planes Where Humans Can't

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 21, 2014) Researchers in South Korea are developing a robotic pilot that could potentially replace humans in the cockpit. Unlike drones and autopilot programs which are configured for specific aircraft, the robots' humanoid design will allow it to fly any type of plane with no additional sensors. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Graphene Paint Offers Rust-Free Future

Graphene Paint Offers Rust-Free Future

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 21, 2014) British scientists have developed a prototype graphene paint that can make coatings which are resistant to liquids, gases, and chemicals. The team says the paint could have a variety of uses, from stopping ships rusting to keeping food fresher for longer. Jim Drury reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Portable Breathalyzer Gets You Home Safely

Portable Breathalyzer Gets You Home Safely

Buzz60 (Oct. 21, 2014) Breeze, a portable breathalyzer, gets you home safely by instantly showing your blood alcohol content, and with one tap, lets you call an Uber, a cab or a friend from your contact list to pick you up. Sean Dowling (@SeanDowlingTV) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins