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Brain Structure Implicated In Early Onset Depression

Date:
January 30, 2004
Source:
BioMed Central
Summary:
Teenagers suffering from depression may have abnormal brain structure, according to new research. An article published in BMC Medicine this week shows that adolescents diagnosed with major depressive disorder tend to have a small hippocampus - a part of the brain associated with motivation, emotion, and memory formation.

Teenagers suffering from depression may have abnormal brain structure, according to new research. An article published in BMC Medicine this week shows that adolescents diagnosed with major depressive disorder tend to have a small hippocampus - a part of the brain associated with motivation, emotion, and memory formation.

Researchers from Dalhousie University and the National Research Council of Canada studied 34 adolescents between the ages of 13 to 18 years old, half of whom were suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) they scanned each volunteer's brain and measured the volume of their left and right hippocampuses.

The hippocampus of patients with MDD was, on average, 17% smaller than that of controls. The size difference was particularly evident in the left hippocampus, where the average volume was 2.53cm3 in patients with depression and 3.05 cm3 in those without.

The authors, Frank MacMaster and Vivek Kusumakar, write: "To our knowledge this is the first published report regarding hippocampal volume in youths with early onset depression compared to healthy controls."

MDD is a severe, common and debilitating illness that is as common in adolescence as it is in adulthood. By studying younger patients the researchers hoped that they would be able to see differences in brain structure that may cause the disorder, rather than those differences that are a side effect of long-term illness or treatment.

The reduced size of the brain structure was not a side effect of the treatment, as patients who were not yet being treated for MDD also had small left hippocampuses compared to controls. The study also showed that people that had suffered from MDD for longer had larger hippocampuses than the more recently diagnosed patients. This suggests that in studies of adult patients, who are long-term sufferers of MDD, the initial difference in hippocampus size may not show up.

"These conclusions should be considered preliminary, considering the small sample sizes used," write the authors. They plan to carry out experiments that use larger sample sizes to confirm these initial findings. They also plan to look more closely at how the size of the hippocampus varies with the progression of major depressive disorder.

###

This press release is based on the following article:

Hippocampal volume in early onset depression Frank P MacMaster and Vivek Kusumakar BMC Medicine 2004, 2:2 Published 29 January 2004

Once published this article will be available online without charge according to BMC Medicine's Open Access policy at http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/2/2/abstract

BMC Medicine (http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcmed/) publishes original research articles, technical advances and study protocols in any area of medical science or clinical practice. To be appropriate for BMC Medicine, articles need to be of special importance and broad interest.

BMC Medicine is published by BioMed Central (http://www.biomedcentral.com), an independent online publishing house committed to providing Open Access to peer-reviewed biological and medical research. This commitment is based on the view that immediate free access to research and the ability to freely archive and reuse published information is essential to the rapid and efficient communication of science. BioMed Central currently publishes over 100 journals across biology and medicine. In addition to open-access original research, BioMed Central also publishes reviews, commentaries and other non-original-research content. Depending on the policies of the individual journal, this content may be open access or provided only to subscribers.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by BioMed Central. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

BioMed Central. "Brain Structure Implicated In Early Onset Depression." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 January 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/01/040129074159.htm>.
BioMed Central. (2004, January 30). Brain Structure Implicated In Early Onset Depression. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/01/040129074159.htm
BioMed Central. "Brain Structure Implicated In Early Onset Depression." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/01/040129074159.htm (accessed April 20, 2014).

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