Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Vitamins Do Little To Prevent Recurrent Stroke

Date:
February 5, 2004
Source:
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center
Summary:
A major national study testing whether high-dose vitamins could prevent another stroke found that the vitamins had little effect, according to a report in today's (Feb. 4) issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – A major national study testing whether high-dose vitamins could prevent another stroke found that the vitamins had little effect, according to a report in today's (Feb. 4) issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

The study, led by James F. Toole, M.D., professor of neurology and director of the Stroke Research Center at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, found nearly identical rates of recurrent strokes and heart attacks between participants on a high dose of folic acid, B6, and B12 vitamins and those taking a low dose.

"High-dose vitamin therapy had no effect on stroke prevention, coronary heart disease events or death in this study, which was disappointing," Toole said.

The study, called VISP (for Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention), involved 3,680 adults who had already had a non-disabling stroke and were being treated at one of 56 centers in the United States, Canada and Scotland. Half of the patients were assigned to the high dose group and half to the low dose.

Neither the patients nor their doctors knew which group they were in. The daily vitamin pills were identical in outward appearance.

During the study, 8.1 percent of patients on the low vitamin dose and 8.4 percent of patients on the high dose had a second stroke, which statistically is nearly identical.

The study found that the vitamin therapy lowered levels of homocysteine – an amino acid – leading the investigators to say, "Findings in other trials of an association between total homocysteine with increased risk of stroke and heart disease suggests that longer trials in different populations with elevated total homocysteine may be necessary."

The study did show that in both the low dose and in the high dose vitamin group those with a high homocysteine level at the start of the study were the most likely to have a recurrent stroke.

Of patients in the low-dose or control group, 6.7 percent had a coronary heart disease "event," usually a heart attack, compared to 6.3 percent of patients on the high dose. Overall deaths from any cause totaled 5.4 percent of the high-dose group compared to 6.3 percent of the low-dose group.

Just after the start of VISP, folate fortification of the U.S. grain supply began (which increased folic acid in breads and other foods containing grains) and it became mandatory in January 1998. This "profoundly reduced" the number of people with low levels of folate and high total homocysteine levels, Toole said.

The study was stopped in December 2002, when the study's performance and safety monitoring board told the funding agency, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, that "there was no chance of showing any difference between the two treatment groups during the remaining follow-up period."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. "Vitamins Do Little To Prevent Recurrent Stroke." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 February 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/02/040203235857.htm>.
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. (2004, February 5). Vitamins Do Little To Prevent Recurrent Stroke. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/02/040203235857.htm
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. "Vitamins Do Little To Prevent Recurrent Stroke." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/02/040203235857.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Generics Eat Into Pfizer's Sales

Generics Eat Into Pfizer's Sales

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 29, 2014) Pfizer, the world's largest drug maker, cut full-year revenue forecasts because generics could cut into sales of its anti-arthritis drug, Celebrex. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Nigeria Ups Ebola Stakes on 1st Death

Nigeria Ups Ebola Stakes on 1st Death

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 29, 2014) Nigerian authorities have shut and quarantined a Lagos hospital where a Liberian man died of the Ebola virus, the first recorded case of the highly-infectious disease in Africa's most populous economy. David Pollard reports Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Running 5 Minutes A Day Might Add Years To Your Life

Running 5 Minutes A Day Might Add Years To Your Life

Newsy (July 29, 2014) According to a new study, just five minutes of running or jogging a day could add years to your life. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Outbreak Poses Little Threat To U.S.: CDC

Ebola Outbreak Poses Little Threat To U.S.: CDC

Newsy (July 29, 2014) The Ebola outbreak in West Africa poses little threat to Americans, according to officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins