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Soft Drinks Not Linked To Decreased Calcium Intake

Date:
March 26, 2004
Source:
Virginia Tech
Summary:
A new study by researchers at the Center for Food and Nutrition Policy (CFNP) at Virginia Tech published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition found that calcium intake among U.S. adolescents although inadequate, has remained a constant since the 1970s and does not appear to be linked to soft drink consumption.

Alexandria, Va. -- A new study by researchers at the Center for Food and Nutrition Policy (CFNP) at Virginia Tech published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition found that calcium intake among U.S. adolescents although inadequate, has remained a constant since the 1970s and does not appear to be linked to soft drink consumption.

The study, conducted by Maureen Storey, PhD, Richard Forshee, PhD and Patricia Anderson, MPP, assessed diet and beverage choices of boys and girls in four age groups: two to three year olds, four to eight year olds, nine to 13 year olds, and 14 to 18 year olds. The data used in the study were from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Continuing Survey of Food Intake by Individuals from (CSFII) 1994-96 and 1998.

According to Maureen Storey, PhD, director of CFNP and lead author of the study, the data continue to show that soft drink consumption by teens is actually far less than is perceived. The study found that adolescent girls (14 to 18 years of age) on average drink about one 12-ounce can of soda a day, and pre-adolescent girls (nine to 13 years of age) drink about three-fourths of a 12-ounce can each day. Consumption of diet carbonated soft drinks is low even among teen girls, who consume an average of only 59 grams, or less than two-tenths of a 12-ounce can, per day.

"Many people have the mistaken impression that adolescent girls are drinking inordinate amounts of soft drinks," Storey said. "However, it is wrong to suggest that girls are consuming gallons of soda pop when the amount they are drinking, about one can a day, is not excessive if they are physically active."

According to the study, Caucasian teenage boys (14 to 18 years old) come closest to meeting the recommended adequate intake (AI) for calcium for their age group, getting about 95 percent of AI. However, this group is the most avid consumer of carbonated soft drinks, drinking nearly two 12-ounce cans a day. In general, younger boys and girls (two to three year olds and four to eight years olds) exceed their recommended AI for calcium, but African-American boys and girls in both age groups have significantly lower percent AIs for calcium than do Caucasian boys and girls.

The study also found that although milk and milk products have the strongest association with calcium intake, soft drink consumption was not linked to decreased calcium intake.

"This is most likely because milk and soft drinks are not close dietary substitutes. Rather, the data suggest that when trade-offs occur, it is more likely to be between carbonated soft drinks, fruit drinks and ades." Storey said.

Milk consumption among adolescent girls remains low, with this group falling far below recommended dietary levels of calcium consumption. To increase calcium consumption among adolescent girls, the study suggests educational and promotional efforts to encourage milk consumption, use of calcium-fortified beverages and foods, and calcium supplements if consumption of dairy products or other calcium-rich foods remains inadequate.

###

This study was funded by an unrestricted grant from the National Soft Drink Association.

The Center for Food and Nutrition Policy (CFNP) is an independent research and education center affiliated with Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) and is located in Alexandria, VA. The mission of CFNP is to advance rational, science-based food and nutrition policy. Through its research, outreach, and teaching programs, the center examines complex and often contentious issues facing government policymakers, regulators, agribusinesses, and food manufacturers. CFNP is recognized as a center of excellence in food and nutrition policy by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Virginia Tech. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Virginia Tech. "Soft Drinks Not Linked To Decreased Calcium Intake." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 March 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/03/040325071447.htm>.
Virginia Tech. (2004, March 26). Soft Drinks Not Linked To Decreased Calcium Intake. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/03/040325071447.htm
Virginia Tech. "Soft Drinks Not Linked To Decreased Calcium Intake." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/03/040325071447.htm (accessed August 21, 2014).

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