Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Month Of Birth Linked To Risk Of Multiple Sclerosis

Date:
December 8, 2004
Source:
British Medical Journal
Summary:
In the northern hemisphere, being born in May is linked to an increased risk of developing multiple sclerosis later in life, while being born in November carries the lowest risk, finds a new study published on bmj.com.

December 6, 2004 -- In the northern hemisphere, being born in May is linked to an increased risk of developing multiple sclerosis later in life, while being born in November carries the lowest risk, finds a new study published on bmj.com today.

The researchers suspect that complex interactions between genes and the environment before or shortly after birth may help to explain this link.

Their study involved 17,874 Canadian patients and 11,502 British patients with multiple sclerosis. Data on month of birth, along with detailed information on demographics and medical and family history, were collected and analysed. The comparison groups were both from the general population and from the unaffected brothers and sisters of those with MS.

In Canada, significantly fewer people with MS were born in November compared with controls. Similarly in Britain, fewer people with MS had been born in November and significantly more had been born in May. The number born in December was also significantly lower.

Adding Danish and Swedish samples to the Canadian and British results (over 42,000 people) showed a 13% increase in risk of MS for those born in May compared with November and a 19% decreased risk for those born in November compared with May.

The effect was most evident in Scotland, where the prevalence of MS is the highest.

These findings conclusively show the association between month of birth and risk of MS in northern countries, but the explanation remains unclear, say the authors.

Previous studies have suggested that exposure to the sun or seasonal variations in a mother's vitamin D levels during pregnancy may have an impact on brain development.

These findings support suggestions that environmental factors both before and immediately after birth may influence the development of the nervous or immune systems and therefore determine the risk for this disease in adult life, they conclude.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by British Medical Journal. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

British Medical Journal. "Month Of Birth Linked To Risk Of Multiple Sclerosis." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 December 2004. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/12/041208094008.htm>.
British Medical Journal. (2004, December 8). Month Of Birth Linked To Risk Of Multiple Sclerosis. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/12/041208094008.htm
British Medical Journal. "Month Of Birth Linked To Risk Of Multiple Sclerosis." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/12/041208094008.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Friday, July 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

AFP (July 24, 2014) A so-called drugs rehab 'clinic' is closed down in Pakistan after police find scores of ‘patients’ chained up alleging serial abuse. Duration 03:05 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Too Few Teens Receiving HPV Vaccination, CDC Says

Too Few Teens Receiving HPV Vaccination, CDC Says

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is blaming doctors for the low number of children being vaccinated for HPV. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The FDA approved Targiniq ER on Wednesday, a painkiller designed to keep users from abusing it. Like any new medication, however, it has doubters. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Newsy (July 24, 2014) Sheik Umar Khan has treated many of the people infected in the Ebola outbreak, and now he's become one of them. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins